Jump to content
The_Great_Hornsby

College Football in 2020 in danger?

Recommended Posts

5 minutes ago, Valmy77 said:

I am not taking my cues for anything serious from any of you.

No offense.

Our track record of correctly diagnosing football issues is bad enough.

.....as if you can guaranty that John Chiles starting wouldn't have changed the course of our recent history..

Edited by MirrOlure

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, B00M said:

Both teams are effectively bubbled before they play. No one wants to be the guy that gets half his team quarantined. 

We've already seen multiple games cancelled/postponed because players on teams that were "effectively bubbled" tested positive. There are plenty of guys willing to be "the guy" that gets his team quarantined. When you were 19, did you pass up on opportunities to get laid? I would have done the backstroke through an ocean of Ebola for an angry handy-j. I still might. 

Edited by JFKFC

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Goodman said:

Ok Wanker, seems best for your sanity to stay off a football board for the next 4 months.

No joke. I reread his post with this picture in my head.


spacer.png

Y’all lay off mainlining the MSM.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, BradInATX said:

 

Where'd you see that one? I hadn't heard that but I certainly believe it. That's pretty interesting, I'd like to read more if you remember your source.

Also, to add on to your "it's not the players, it's the janitors, staff etc.". It's also the players' families. There's a lot of risk there, IMO, particularly around the holidays.

From the "Annals of Internal Medicine" - Article around Obesity & Mortality in the Kaiser Permanente System in Socal.

Here is clip from article. Really spikes in terms of higher risk of mortality if your BMI is 40+ (considered severely obese). I used the low end of the higher risk in my post. Ultimately as I mentioned on other board we are in "Nut allergy" phase to me of CV19. If you know you are at risk of dying from CV19 (which the groups that are at higher risk are WELL established at this juncture) you need to enact the needed precautions to manage that risk. This may include not visiting grand children, going out to eat etc etc. Just like if you had a severe nut allergy you'd ensure that when you did go out you were not at risk of dying of it. (you'd verify restaurant doesn't cook with nuts/let airline know you were traveling and so on).

image.png.1c528ed9a49c2fa2347069c9c2138c9d.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, BrazilHorn said:

From the "Annals of Internal Medicine" - Article around Obesity & Mortality in the Kaiser Permanente System in Socal.

Here is clip from article. Really spikes in terms of higher risk of mortality if your BMI is 40+ (considered severely obese). I used the low end of the higher risk in my post. Ultimately as I mentioned on other board we are in "Nut allergy" phase to me of CV19. If you know you are at risk of dying from CV19 (which the groups that are at higher risk are WELL established at this juncture) you need to enact the needed precautions to manage that risk. This may include not visiting grand children, going out to eat etc etc. Just like if you had a severe nut allergy you'd ensure that when you did go out you were not at risk of dying of it. (you'd verify restaurant doesn't cook with nuts/let airline know you were traveling and so on).

image.png.1c528ed9a49c2fa2347069c9c2138c9d.png

Nice. Found the link. That's really interesting, particularly the rest of that visualization that you cut off, but more discussion of that probably belongs in the DT, not here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, BradInATX said:

Nice. Found the link. That's really interesting, particularly the rest of that visualization that you cut off, but more discussion of that probably belongs in the DT, not here.

Yep - some really cool stuff. I was just showing the piece for <60 years old. One thing for sure is this disease is an absolute fucking killer if you are over 80. It is bad for those 60 to 80 but man if you are >80 and get this you have a VERY high likelihood of dying

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, BrazilHorn said:

Really spikes in terms of higher risk of mortality if your BMI is 40+

On the positive side, maybe this pandemic will serve as a wake up call to the large percentage of Americans who are categorized as obese. And we'll see widespread societal change in exercise frequency, the importance of being active with your children, less reliance on packaged foods, and portion contr....

 

Damnit, I almost got through it without laughing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, 4th&Five said:

 

Weird. He could have just said they won't be releasing data to maintain player privacy and not come off like a douche.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, aggie08 said:

Weird. He could have just said they won't be releasing data to maintain player privacy and not come off like a douche.

Unpossible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, aggie08 said:

Weird. He could have just said they won't be releasing data to maintain player privacy and not come off like a douche.

Apparently, he couldn't.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, JFKFC said:

We've already seen multiple games cancelled/postponed because players on teams that were "effectively bubbled" tested positive. There are plenty of guys willing to be "the guy" that gets his team quarantined. When you were 19, did you pass up on opportunities to get laid? I would have done the backstroke through an ocean of Ebola for an angry handy-j. I still might. 

Sure, some reckless age-appropriate activities will be occur. But on average, are they more or less likely to swim thru ebola for that handy if they're playing football? How do you think those PAC and B1G players are behaving right now? 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, TrashMaster G said:

MLB has had many series canceled/delayed.  They are still chugging along, without a bubble.  It CAN be done.

MLB also plays several times a week, can do makeup games with double headers, and comparisons of records is less problematic when there are so many games are played. How is the Big XII going to compare records when games are inevitably cancelled and not made up? What if Bedlam or TX/OU are cancelled due to outbreaks? What if ISU doesn't play OU because of an outbreak while everyone else has to play them? What if a team is unable to play two of OU, TX, OSU, meaning they avoid some of the highest ranked teams on their schedule? That is my biggest concern. I think it is going to be a complete clusterfuck to determine who plays for the conference title.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, 'stache said:

MLB also plays several times a week, can do makeup games with double headers, and comparisons of records is less problematic when there are so many games are played. How is the Big XII going to compare records when games are inevitably cancelled and not made up? What if Bedlam or TX/OU are cancelled due to outbreaks? What if ISU doesn't play OU because of an outbreak while everyone else has to play them? What if a team is unable to play two of OU, TX, OSU, meaning they avoid some of the highest ranked teams on their schedule? That is my biggest concern. I think it is going to be a complete clusterfuck to determine who plays for the conference title.

OU will be one team, of course. Even if they somehow played 1 game and lost it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, BrazilHorn said:

From the "Annals of Internal Medicine" - Article around Obesity & Mortality in the Kaiser Permanente System in Socal.

Here is clip from article. Really spikes in terms of higher risk of mortality if your BMI is 40+ (considered severely obese). I used the low end of the higher risk in my post. Ultimately as I mentioned on other board we are in "Nut allergy" phase to me of CV19. If you know you are at risk of dying from CV19 (which the groups that are at higher risk are WELL established at this juncture) you need to enact the needed precautions to manage that risk. This may include not visiting grand children, going out to eat etc etc. Just like if you had a severe nut allergy you'd ensure that when you did go out you were not at risk of dying of it. (you'd verify restaurant doesn't cook with nuts/let airline know you were traveling and so on).

image.png.1c528ed9a49c2fa2347069c9c2138c9d.png

 

Way too logical, much easier to manage a nut allergy by simply not eating.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, 'stache said:

MLB also plays several times a week, can do makeup games with double headers, and comparisons of records is less problematic when there are so many games are played. How is the Big XII going to compare records when games are inevitably cancelled and not made up? What if Bedlam or TX/OU are cancelled due to outbreaks? What if ISU doesn't play OU because of an outbreak while everyone else has to play them? What if a team is unable to play two of OU, TX, OSU, meaning they avoid some of the highest ranked teams on their schedule? That is my biggest concern. I think it is going to be a complete clusterfuck to determine who plays for the conference title.

They don't care about records or champions...  they are trying to salvage the billions of dollars generated by the games so they don't complicate things even more with the collateral damages from COVID.  

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, 'stache said:

MLB also plays several times a week, can do makeup games with double headers, and comparisons of records is less problematic when there are so many games are played. How is the Big XII going to compare records when games are inevitably cancelled and not made up? What if Bedlam or TX/OU are cancelled due to outbreaks? What if ISU doesn't play OU because of an outbreak while everyone else has to play them? What if a team is unable to play two of OU, TX, OSU, meaning they avoid some of the highest ranked teams on their schedule? That is my biggest concern. I think it is going to be a complete clusterfuck to determine who plays for the conference title.

skynet decides, duh

I honestly have not even looked, but is there a conf champ game even scheduled?  I would imaging the TV network could be talked into televising several postponed games during that week to try and make up any.  Or athletic depts just say fuck it.  I know QB1 and the DBs are all running fevers and can;t smell shit on Friday night but we are playing full strength.  I think it was the  Marlins that did that.  They knew for sure that some of the players positive and through a chain of text messages determined to just keep playing.  This was 1 of 60-something baseball games.  I have my doubts that some/most programs won't fudge the numbers to randomly skip testing their star players this season.

Reminds of the Johnny B Good movie where he encounters some scrawny guy in the USC locker room and asks him position he plays.  Dude replies that he is the official drug test pisser or something like that.

Edited by gyroprotagonist

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, aggie08 said:

Weird. He could have just said they won't be releasing data to maintain player privacy and not come off like a douche.

But he is a douche. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/4/2020 at 4:11 PM, Monster said:

But, but...the guy that's famous for drawing cartoon dicks said we shouldn't play football this year. 

 

 

Meh, he was just being a dick.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Don Johnson said:

 

That infamous high school in Georgia that went on-line after viral photos in the hallway won its first football game 24-7 the other day. School is partially re-opening this week as hybrid model

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, BrazilHorn said:

From the "Annals of Internal Medicine" - Article around Obesity & Mortality in the Kaiser Permanente System in Socal.

Here is clip from article. Really spikes in terms of higher risk of mortality if your BMI is 40+ (considered severely obese). I used the low end of the higher risk in my post. Ultimately as I mentioned on other board we are in "Nut allergy" phase to me of CV19. If you know you are at risk of dying from CV19 (which the groups that are at higher risk are WELL established at this juncture) you need to enact the needed precautions to manage that risk. This may include not visiting grand children, going out to eat etc etc. Just like if you had a severe nut allergy you'd ensure that when you did go out you were not at risk of dying of it. (you'd verify restaurant doesn't cook with nuts/let airline know you were traveling and so on).

image.png.1c528ed9a49c2fa2347069c9c2138c9d.png

The spread of those confidence intervals makes me think this was a really small n study. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Rudiger said:

The spread of those confidence intervals makes me think this was a really small n study. 

~7000 people. So large enough for sampling type work and one of the largest ones I have seen specifically targeting examination of role obesity plays in CV19 mortality rates.

Definitely opens eyes to need for a much larger, broader study.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, BrazilHorn said:

~7000 people. So large enough for sampling type work and one of the largest ones I have seen specifically targeting examination of role obesity plays in CV19 mortality rates.

Definitely opens eyes to need for a much larger, broader study.

Wow, I thought it was going to be a few hundred. Wonder why the ranges on the CIs?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Rudiger said:

Wow, I thought it was going to be a few hundred. Wonder why the ranges on the CIs?

I think due to fact that it is not a homogeneous population but rather the 6917 sample size is spread out across multiple different types of folks that can in effect create this range.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, BrazilHorn said:

I think due to fact that it is not a homogeneous population but rather the 6917 sample size is spread out across multiple different types of folks that can in effect create this range.

Looks like a good thing I stuck with liberal arts. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

It takes some callous, stupid pieces of shit to downplay it just to watch a bunch of unpaid kids bash their heads into each other. 

So far this year, 26,000 students nationwide have been diagnosed with coronavirus.  ZERO PERCENT of these students have needed hospitalization.  Most were unaware that they had this "deadly virus".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, 4th&Five said:

Source? At least one student at Penn State died. 

One out of 26,000 would still round to 0%.  Or, you could call it 0.00385%

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, BrazilHorn said:

~7000 people. So large enough for sampling type work and one of the largest ones I have seen specifically targeting examination of role obesity plays in CV19 mortality rates.

Definitely opens eyes to need for a much larger, broader study.

ISWYDT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, 4th&Five said:

Source? At least one student at Penn State died. 

Nope.   This is a perfect example of the national media misreporting and not correcting itself.   The PSU student had left the PSU campus 2 months prior & returned home to Allentown.   2 weeks after testing positive for covid and self quarantining/feeling asymptomatic he died of diabetic ketoacidosis.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, DenverHorn said:

2 weeks after testing positive for covid and self quarantining/feeling asymptomatic he died of diabetic ketoacidosis.

 Viral illnesses and Type 1 diabetes are bad juju. Flu kills many pediatric Type 1 patients every year. Flu shots really do help this population. Not sure there are many Type 1 college football players though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, DenverHorn said:

Nope.   This is a perfect example of the national media misreporting and not correcting itself.   The PSU student had left the PSU campus 2 months prior & returned home to Allentown.   2 weeks after testing positive for covid and self quarantining/feeling asymptomatic he died of diabetic ketoacidosis.

But I won’t be getting up today.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, Cornfusion said:

So far this year, 26,000 students nationwide have been diagnosed with coronavirus.  ZERO PERCENT of these students have needed hospitalization.  Most were unaware that they had this "deadly virus".

 

https://www.indystar.com/story/sports/college/indiana/2020/08/14/coronavirus-link-heart-issues-concern-ncaa-student-athletes-indiana-hooisers-covid-19-myocarditis/3374224001/

 

"The story of Indiana offensive lineman Brady Feeney, who was sidelined as medical personnel monitored a potential heart abnormality stemming from COVID-19, has since been mentioned as a cautionary tale by leaders of the Mid-American and Pac-12 conferences. NCAA chief medical officer Brian Hainline said Thursday he knows of a dozen cases of myocarditis, specifically, among NCAA student-athletes, and the NCAA has just updated guidance for institutions on how to screen for the condition."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Cornfusion said:

So far this year, 26,000 students nationwide have been diagnosed with coronavirus.  ZERO PERCENT of these students have needed hospitalization.  Most were unaware that they had this "deadly virus".

Why'd you put deadly virus in quotations? Are implying that it's not a deadly virus? Because yeah, it is a deadly virus.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, touchthemonolith said:

Why'd you put deadly virus in quotations? Are implying that it's not a deadly virus? Because yeah, it is a deadly virus.

I don't consider something deadly unless it's worse than rabies: 

You go camping, and at midday you decide to take a nap in a nice little hammock. While sleeping, a tiny brown bat, in the "rage" stages of infection is fidgeting in broad daylight, uncomfortable, and thirsty (due to the hydrophobia) and you snort, startling him. He goes into attack mode. 

Except you're asleep, and he's a little brown bat, so weighs around 6 grams. You don't even feel him land on your bare knee, and he starts to bite. His teeth are tiny. Hardly enough to even break the skin, but he does manage to give you the equivalent of a tiny scrape that goes completely unnoticed. 

Rabies does not travel in your blood. In fact, a blood test won't even tell you if you've got it. (Antibody tests may be done, but are useless if you've ever been vaccinated.) 

You wake up, none the wiser. If you notice anything at the bite site at all, you assume you just lightly scraped it on something. 

The bomb has been lit, and your nervous system is the wick. The rabies will multiply along your nervous system, doing virtually no damage, and completely undetectable. You literally have NO symptoms. 

It may be four days, it may be a year, but the camping trip is most likely long forgotten. Then one day your back starts to ache... Or maybe you get a slight headache? 

At this point, you're already dead. There is no cure.

(The sole caveat to this is the Milwaukee Protocol, which leaves most patients dead anyway, and the survivors mentally disabled, and is seldom done - see below). 

There's no treatment. It has a 100% kill rate. 

Absorb that. Not a single other virus on the planet has a 100% kill rate. Only rabies. And once you're symptomatic, it's over. You're dead. 

So what does that look like? 

Your headache turns into a fever, and a general feeling of being unwell. You're fidgety. Uncomfortable. And scared. As the virus that has taken its time getting into your brain finds a vast network of nerve endings, it begins to rapidly reproduce, starting at the base of your brain... Where your "pons" is located. This is the part of the brain that controls communication between the rest of the brain and body, as well as sleep cycles. 

Next you become anxious. You still think you have only a mild fever, but suddenly you find yourself becoming scared, even horrified, and it doesn't occur to you that you don't know why. This is because the rabies is chewing up your amygdala. 

As your cerebellum becomes hot with the virus, you begin to lose muscle coordination, and balance. You think maybe it's a good idea to go to the doctor now, but assuming a doctor is smart enough to even run the tests necessary in the few days you have left on the planet, odds are they'll only be able to tell your loved ones what you died of later. 

You're twitchy, shaking, and scared. You have the normal fear of not knowing what's going on, but with the virus really fucking the amygdala this is amplified a hundred fold. It's around this time the hydrophobia starts. 

You're horribly thirsty, you just want water. But you can't drink. Every time you do, your throat clamps shut and you vomit. This has become a legitimate, active fear of water. You're thirsty, but looking at a glass of water begins to make you gag, and shy back in fear. The contradiction is hard for your hot brain to see at this point. By now, the doctors will have to put you on IVs to keep you hydrated, but even that's futile. You were dead the second you had a headache. 

You begin hearing things, or not hearing at all as your thalamus goes. You taste sounds, you see smells, everything starts feeling like the most horrifying acid trip anyone has ever been on. With your hippocampus long under attack, you're having trouble remembering things, especially family. 

You're alone, hallucinating, thirsty, confused, and absolutely, undeniably terrified. Everything scares the literal shit out of you at this point. These strange people in lab coats. These strange people standing around your bed crying, who keep trying to get you "drink something" and crying. And it's only been about a week since that little headache that you've completely forgotten. Time means nothing to you anymore. Funny enough, you now know how the bat felt when he bit you.

Eventually, you slip into the "dumb rabies" phase. Your brain has started the process of shutting down. Too much of it has been turned to liquid virus. Your face droops. You drool. You're all but unaware of what's around you. A sudden noise or light might startle you, but for the most part, it's all you can do to just stare at the ground. You haven't really slept for about 72 hours. 

Then you die. Always, you die. 

And there's not one... fucking... thing... anyone can do for you. 

Then there's the question of what to do with your corpse. I mean, sure, burying it is the right thing to do. But the fucking virus can survive in a corpse for years. You could kill every rabid animal on the planet today, and if two years from now, some moist, preserved, rotten hunk of used-to-be brain gets eaten by an animal, it starts all over.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, totallynotabuttpirate said:

I don't consider something deadly unless it's worse than rabies: 

You go camping, and at midday you decide to take a nap in a nice little hammock. While sleeping, a tiny brown bat, in the "rage" stages of infection is fidgeting in broad daylight, uncomfortable, and thirsty (due to the hydrophobia) and you snort, startling him. He goes into attack mode. 

Except you're asleep, and he's a little brown bat, so weighs around 6 grams. You don't even feel him land on your bare knee, and he starts to bite. His teeth are tiny. Hardly enough to even break the skin, but he does manage to give you the equivalent of a tiny scrape that goes completely unnoticed. 

Rabies does not travel in your blood. In fact, a blood test won't even tell you if you've got it. (Antibody tests may be done, but are useless if you've ever been vaccinated.) 

You wake up, none the wiser. If you notice anything at the bite site at all, you assume you just lightly scraped it on something. 

The bomb has been lit, and your nervous system is the wick. The rabies will multiply along your nervous system, doing virtually no damage, and completely undetectable. You literally have NO symptoms. 

It may be four days, it may be a year, but the camping trip is most likely long forgotten. Then one day your back starts to ache... Or maybe you get a slight headache? 

At this point, you're already dead. There is no cure.

(The sole caveat to this is the Milwaukee Protocol, which leaves most patients dead anyway, and the survivors mentally disabled, and is seldom done - see below). 

There's no treatment. It has a 100% kill rate. 

Absorb that. Not a single other virus on the planet has a 100% kill rate. Only rabies. And once you're symptomatic, it's over. You're dead. 

So what does that look like? 

Your headache turns into a fever, and a general feeling of being unwell. You're fidgety. Uncomfortable. And scared. As the virus that has taken its time getting into your brain finds a vast network of nerve endings, it begins to rapidly reproduce, starting at the base of your brain... Where your "pons" is located. This is the part of the brain that controls communication between the rest of the brain and body, as well as sleep cycles. 

Next you become anxious. You still think you have only a mild fever, but suddenly you find yourself becoming scared, even horrified, and it doesn't occur to you that you don't know why. This is because the rabies is chewing up your amygdala. 

As your cerebellum becomes hot with the virus, you begin to lose muscle coordination, and balance. You think maybe it's a good idea to go to the doctor now, but assuming a doctor is smart enough to even run the tests necessary in the few days you have left on the planet, odds are they'll only be able to tell your loved ones what you died of later. 

You're twitchy, shaking, and scared. You have the normal fear of not knowing what's going on, but with the virus really fucking the amygdala this is amplified a hundred fold. It's around this time the hydrophobia starts. 

You're horribly thirsty, you just want water. But you can't drink. Every time you do, your throat clamps shut and you vomit. This has become a legitimate, active fear of water. You're thirsty, but looking at a glass of water begins to make you gag, and shy back in fear. The contradiction is hard for your hot brain to see at this point. By now, the doctors will have to put you on IVs to keep you hydrated, but even that's futile. You were dead the second you had a headache. 

You begin hearing things, or not hearing at all as your thalamus goes. You taste sounds, you see smells, everything starts feeling like the most horrifying acid trip anyone has ever been on. With your hippocampus long under attack, you're having trouble remembering things, especially family. 

You're alone, hallucinating, thirsty, confused, and absolutely, undeniably terrified. Everything scares the literal shit out of you at this point. These strange people in lab coats. These strange people standing around your bed crying, who keep trying to get you "drink something" and crying. And it's only been about a week since that little headache that you've completely forgotten. Time means nothing to you anymore. Funny enough, you now know how the bat felt when he bit you.

Eventually, you slip into the "dumb rabies" phase. Your brain has started the process of shutting down. Too much of it has been turned to liquid virus. Your face droops. You drool. You're all but unaware of what's around you. A sudden noise or light might startle you, but for the most part, it's all you can do to just stare at the ground. You haven't really slept for about 72 hours. 

Then you die. Always, you die. 

And there's not one... fucking... thing... anyone can do for you. 

Then there's the question of what to do with your corpse. I mean, sure, burying it is the right thing to do. But the fucking virus can survive in a corpse for years. You could kill every rabid animal on the planet today, and if two years from now, some moist, preserved, rotten hunk of used-to-be brain gets eaten by an animal, it starts all over.

Uh you're a fucking lunatic, bro.

You know what's even more deadly than COVID and rabies? Flying an SR-71 in a combat situation. Trust me, as a former SR-71 pilot, and a professional keynote speaker, the question I'm most often asked is "How fast would that SR-71 fly?" I can be assured of hearing that question several times at any event I attend. It's an interesting question, given the aircraft's proclivity for speed, but there really isn't one number to give, as the jet would always give you a little more speed if you wanted it to. It was common to see 35 miles a minute. Because we flew a programmed Mach number on most missions, and never wanted to harm the plane in any way, we never let it run out to any limits of temperature or speed. Thus, each SR-71 pilot had his own individual “high” speed that he saw at some point on some mission. I saw mine over Libya when Khadafy fired two missiles my way, and max power was in order. Let’s just say that the plane truly loved speed and effortlessly took us to Mach numbers we hadn’t previously seen. So it was with great surprise, when at the end of one of my presentations, someone asked, “what was the slowest you ever flew the Blackbird?” This was a first. After giving it some thought, I was reminded of a story that I had never shared before, and relayed the following.

I was flying the SR-71 out of RAF Mildenhall, England , with my back-seater, Walt Watson; we were returning from a mission over Europe and the Iron Curtain when we received a radio transmission from home base. As we scooted across Denmark in three minutes, we learned that a small RAF base in the English countryside had requested an SR-71 fly-past. The air cadet commander there was a former Blackbird pilot, and thought it would be a motivating moment for the young lads to see the mighty SR-71 perform a low approach. No problem, we were happy to do it. After a quick aerial refueling over the North Sea , we proceeded to find the small airfield. Walter had a myriad of sophisticated navigation equipment in the back seat, and began to vector me toward the field. Descending to subsonic speeds, we found ourselves over a densely wooded area in a slight haze. Like most former WWII British airfields, the one we were looking for had a small tower and little surrounding infrastructure. Walter told me we were close and that I should be able to see the field, but I saw nothing. Nothing but trees as far as I could see in the haze. We got a little lower, and I pulled the throttles back from 325 knots we were at. With the gear up, anything under 275 was just uncomfortable. Walt said we were practically over the field—yet; there was nothing in my windscreen. I banked the jet and started a gentle circling maneuver in hopes of picking up anything that looked like a field. Meanwhile, below, the cadet commander had taken the cadets up on the catwalk of the tower in order to get a prime view of the fly-past. It was a quiet, still day with no wind and partial gray overcast. Walter continued to give me indications that the field should be below us but in the overcast and haze, I couldn't see it.. The longer we continued to peer out the window and circle, the slower we got. With our power back, the awaiting cadets heard nothing. I must have had good instructors in my flying career, as something told me I better cross-check the gauges.

As I noticed the airspeed indicator slide below 160 knots, my heart stopped and my adrenalin-filled left hand pushed two throttles full forward. At this point we weren't really flying, but were falling in a slight bank. Just at the moment that both afterburners lit with a thunderous roar of flame (and what a joyous feeling that was) the aircraft fell into full view of the shocked observers on the tower. Shattering the still quiet of that morning, they now had 107 feet of fire-breathing titanium in their face as the plane leveled and accelerated, in full burner, on the tower side of the infield, closer than expected, maintaining what could only be described as some sort of ultimate knife-edge pass. Quickly reaching the field boundary, we proceeded back to Mildenhall without incident. We didn't say a word for those next 14 minutes. After landing, our commander greeted us, and we were both certain he was reaching for our wings. Instead, he heartily shook our hands and said the commander had told him it was the greatest SR-71 fly-past he had ever seen, especially how we had surprised them with such a precise maneuver that could only be described as breathtaking. He said that some of the cadet’s hats were blown off and the sight of the plan form of the plane in full afterburner dropping right in front of them was unbelievable. Walt and I both understood the concept of “breathtaking” very well that morning, and sheepishly replied that they were just excited to see our low approach. As we retired to the equipment room to change from space suits to flight suits, we just sat there-we hadn't spoken a word since “the pass.” Finally, Walter looked at me and said, “One hundred fifty-six knots. What did you see?” Trying to find my voice, I stammered, “One hundred fifty-two.” We sat in silence for a moment. Then Walt said, “Don’t ever do that to me again!” And I never did. A year later, Walter and I were having lunch in the Mildenhall Officer’s club, and overheard an officer talking to some cadets about an SR-71 fly-past that he had seen one day. Of course, by now the story included kids falling off the tower and screaming as the heat of the jet singed their eyebrows. Noticing our HABU patches, as we stood there with lunch trays in our hands, he asked us to verify to the cadets that such a thing had occurred. Walt just shook his head and said, “It was probably just a routine low approach; they're pretty impressive in that plane.” Impressive indeed. Little did I realize after relaying this experience to my audience that day that it would become one of the most popular and most requested stories. It’s ironic that people are interested in how slow the world’s fastest jet can fly. Regardless of your speed, however, it’s always a good idea to keep that cross-check up…and keep your Mach up, too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Don Johnson said:

 

What a bunch of idiots.  Don’t the know the only place you can catch Covid is on the football field.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, JFKFC said:

 

Sad but doesn't sound like it was anything football related.

"It is unclear how he contracted the disease. Stephens played in 32 games for California University in his first three seasons. The school was not playing football this fall with COVID-19 health concerns forcing sports to be halted by the Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference."

https://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/ncaaf/2020/09/08/college-football-player-jamain-stephens-dies-covid-complications/5752177002/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


mpu


Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
×
×
  • Create New...