Jump to content

Three Gorges Dam under strain, millions evacuated


GRHorn

Recommended Posts

  • 10 months later...
8 minutes ago, Pato del Muerto said:

Can we sell them corn at astronomical prices and retire some of our debt they hold?

or do we have to give them corn in exchange for them not calling in al of the debt they hold?

Maybe they can throw in some chips/semiconductors for the corn? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

32 minutes ago, Pato del Muerto said:

Can we sell them corn at astronomical prices and retire some of our debt they hold?

or do we have to give them corn in exchange for them not calling in al of the debt they hold?

They can’t afford to not keep absorbing more US debt, let alone call in their current holdings.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

42 minutes ago, Trey3216 said:

They can’t afford to not keep absorbing more US debt, let alone call in their current holdings.  

Whatever that saying is, if I owe you $1m that is my problem, if I owe you $1Trillion that is your problem, or something.

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, GringoSalado said:

Whatever that saying is, if I owe you $1m that is my problem, if I owe you $1Trillion that is your problem, or something.

IF they want to keep feeding their people, they have to continue to sell shitty products to their biggest consumer.  

  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

China might have the upper hand: It sits on the source of 10 major rivers, which aggregately flow through 11 countries and supply 1.6 billion people with water. China controls Tibet and the Tibetan Plateau, otherwise known as the world’s “Third Pole” because its glaciers give birth to the lion’s share of Asia’s rivers. Therefore, China’s upstream actions — for instance, its dam-building — have scores of impacts for downstream countries. Dechen Palmo, a research fellow at the Tibet Policy Institute, was not exaggerating when he wrote in The Diplomat that “the future of Asia’s water lies in China’s hands.”

https://harvardpolitics.com/china-water-policy/

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/19/2021 at 10:57 AM, Pato del Muerto said:

Can we sell them corn at astronomical prices and retire some of our debt they hold?

or do we have to give them corn in exchange for them not calling in al of the debt they hold?

 

Don't they own  a significant portion of US farms?

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, High Plains Drifter said:

 

Don't they own  a significant portion of US farms?

 

 

They have the largest ownership of US farmland of any foreign country, but it's not a "significant portion" of US farmland.  They own ~191,000 acres, most of it tied to their ownership of Smithfield Foods.  

Total US farmland is around 915 million acres.

So China owns ~ 0.02% of US farmland.

They also only own ~$1.1 trillion, of the US's ~$22 trillion, in debt.  That's a lot, for sure, but again it's a pretty small percentage of the overall total.  Japan owns slightly more at around $1.2 trillion, and is the largest foreign holder of US debt.

 

  • Hook 'Em 6
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
On 7/19/2021 at 12:17 PM, GringoSalado said:

Whatever that saying is, if I owe you $1m that is my problem, if I owe you $1Trillion that is your problem, or something.

That’s an old Confusedcious saying.

Edited by Armybrat
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 minutes ago, atomheartbevo said:

So these are the heaviest rains in 1,000 years.   That’ll leave a mark.  

Yeah it's pretty incredible.  I know China is Asshole, but I don't wish natural disasters like this on anyone.  It's the people, not their government, that will suffer.

  • Hook 'Em 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, utee94 said:

They have the largest ownership of US farmland of any foreign country, but it's not a "significant portion" of US farmland.  They own ~191,000 acres, most of it tied to their ownership of Smithfield Foods.  

Total US farmland is around 915 million acres.

So China owns ~ 0.02% of US farmland.

They also only own ~$1.1 trillion, of the US's ~$22 trillion, in debt.  That's a lot, for sure, but again it's a pretty small percentage of the overall total.  Japan owns slightly more at around $1.2 trillion, and is the largest foreign holder of US debt.

 

sounds like we've taken some sound financial advice:

Diversify Your Bonds Wu Tang GIFs | Tenor

  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
7 minutes ago, strangulation! said:

sounds like we've taken some sound financial advice:

Diversify Your Bonds Wu Tang GIFs | Tenor

Indeed.  In fact, we're so clever, that the US government and Federal Reserve bank own the largest share of our debt.  Seems a little shady, no?

Here's a handy infographic.  It's from 2018 but the story is largely the same.

 

MW-GO672_nation_20180821130954_MG.jpg?uuid=05b585b6-a565-11e8-b6ab-ac162d7bc1f7

Edited by utee94
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/19/2021 at 2:53 PM, washparkhorn said:

China might have the upper hand: It sits on the source of 10 major rivers, which aggregately flow through 11 countries and supply 1.6 billion people with water. China controls Tibet and the Tibetan Plateau, otherwise known as the world’s “Third Pole” because its glaciers give birth to the lion’s share of Asia’s rivers. Therefore, China’s upstream actions — for instance, its dam-building — have scores of impacts for downstream countries. Dechen Palmo, a research fellow at the Tibet Policy Institute, was not exaggerating when he wrote in The Diplomat that “the future of Asia’s water lies in China’s hands.”

https://harvardpolitics.com/china-water-policy/

it's amazing how many hugenormous rivers start basically right next to each other.  at one point the irawaddy, salween, mekong, and yangtze pass within 70 miles of each other, each basically another valley over from the next.  the yellow's headwaters aren't very far away, and the brahmaputra passes nearby as well.  blame india for moving north, i guess. 

  • Hook 'Em 2
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Updawg said:

Google mapping China is crazy. A lot of those cities are like Houston. It’s scary to see how much they have changed the resources etc. no idea how it can keep up.

and google maps ain't anywhere near accurate anymore.  a friend teaches english in hefei and they've put in 4 whole subway lines since the last time google maps was updated. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/19/2021 at 2:45 PM, washparkhorn said:

China's hydro policy is, in part, a strategic decision to control water downstream. 

There will be wars over fresh water. 

 

Isn't this what sparked their latest clash with India where they were fighting with swords?  China’s plans to construct a dam on the Yarlung Zangbo River which would affect the Brahmaputra river in India. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/19/2021 at 2:53 PM, washparkhorn said:

China might have the upper hand: It sits on the source of 10 major rivers, which aggregately flow through 11 countries and supply 1.6 billion people with water. China controls Tibet and the Tibetan Plateau, otherwise known as the world’s “Third Pole” because its glaciers give birth to the lion’s share of Asia’s rivers. Therefore, China’s upstream actions — for instance, its dam-building — have scores of impacts for downstream countries. Dechen Palmo, a research fellow at the Tibet Policy Institute, was not exaggerating when he wrote in The Diplomat that “the future of Asia’s water lies in China’s hands.”

https://harvardpolitics.com/china-water-policy/

True, but it seems like Dams...especially shoddily built dams...would be major strategic weak points 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...