Jump to content

Remembering 9/11


Moby Ric

Recommended Posts

all the chaos, war, and deaths that has happened since then.  i can't even remember why the fuckheads did what they did but prob had something to do with palestinians, infidels in the middle east, yada yada.  i think it's fair so to say that tens of thousands if not hundreds thousands of muslims (many innocent) have been killed as a result of these shitheads' actions.  i wonder if they knew that nothing would change for the better and that only death came from their efforts, if they wouldn't have done it.

 

whom am i kidding?  yes because dying for your religion while killing innocent people is a wonderful thing.  fuckheads.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was working in Dallas at the time in Trammell Crow Center.  After quickly determining what a fucked up day it was going to be, our managing partner emailed the whole firm to tell everyone to go home.  There was a slow, eerily quiet procession from downtown as cops were directing the exodus of traffic.  I'll never forget that scene.  I went straight to a grocery store to buy beer, and then went home and drank all day while watching the news.

I also remember the first time I flew after 9/11.  It was a month or so later.  Well after a normal flight schedule had resumed, but still recent enough where people were freaked out about flying.  It wasn't international, just DFW to Nashville, but the plane was maybe a third full.  I'd never been so nervous on a flight.  I also had this great Coach pocket knife keychain that was a Christmas gift from my dad.  Needless to say, it was the last time I saw that. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We saw humanity at its very worst and very best that day.  I'm still processing that lesson seventeen years later.

I was able to go to the 9/11 Memorial a couple of years ago.  I was struck by the amount of international visitors paying their respects.  It was a moving experience to say the least.

One last thing: it is a miracle that we haven't been hit again.  I suspect that the stories we'll never hear would make Hollywood thriller writers green with envy.  A tip of the cap to all of our intelligence agencies and those of our allies.  

I hope we have a simple, peaceful Tuesday today.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I too went to the 9/11 Memorial 2 years ago, and it was pretty powerful.  I encourage everyone to go.

A day that will live in infamy indeed.  I think of those people forced out of the windows by the heat, and then making the decision that it is better to jump than burn.  Haunting.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, TexArcher said:

One last thing: it is a miracle that we haven't been hit again.  I suspect that the stories we'll never hear would make Hollywood thriller writers green with envy.  A tip of the cap to all of our intelligence agencies and those of our allies.  

This is my only cloak-room-ish comment in response to this: 

Read The Looming Tower (Pulitzer Price-winning book by Austin-resident Lawrence Wright), and you'll understand that as good a job as our intelligence community has done to prevent another attack like this, they still haven't made up for the colossal fuck up that led to 9/11. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Went to work after the first tower was hit and for a short while it didn't look that bad--from the angle I saw on TV it seemed like a small plane had hit it.  On the way to work 740 AM said that the other tower had been hit.  Then it was obvious what happened.  At work I heard that one of the towers collapsed and I couldn't believe it.  Then the next one fell.  Everyone pretty much went home.  On the way home I stopped at church and was amazed that only two or three people were there.  My wife picked up our kids from elementary school (kindergarten and 3rd grade).

The next week I had to be in NYC and I was on one of the first flights out.  IAH was like a ghost town.  The plane was about 20% full.  It was delayed for about 30 minutes while they got two middle eastern-looking guys off the plane.  We landed in Newark and we had a great view of Ground Zero.  Of course it was still smoldering.  On the way to my hotel in midtown my driver passed a fire station.  Flowers were piled up all over the front of the station and there were probably 50 or so people holding a candlelight vigil.  I asked the driver to pull in for a minute.  

The next day walking to the office for my deposition everyone on the streets was clearly still in a state of shock.  The depo was about 1/3 of the usual time for such a depo and everyone pretty much was just going through the motions.  I'll never forget that trip.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My stepkids were 10 and 6.  I kept them back from school and tried to get them to understand what was going on.  Not much luck.  It could have been a video game -- it was really frustrating.

I was already "too old" to serve, but I understand the feelings that inspired so many young men and women to enlist in the armed forces.  We were all so pissed off.

I am an eternal sunshine pumper, and I actually took hope that the "across the aisle" consensus might last.  What a dumbass I was.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, Sbbruin said:

I too went to the 9/11 Memorial 2 years ago, and it was pretty powerful.  I encourage everyone to go.

Agreed.  It's like you're walking down into a crypt.  There are so many haunting pieces preserved from the wreckage that day -- filing cabinets, watches, ID cards.  And all around you are television screens replaying the news of the day, making it seem more like you're thrown back into time.  Like someone else said, the best and worst of humanity are presented in that museum.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, jimmyjazz said:

My stepkids were 10 and 6.  I kept them back from school and tried to get them to understand what was going on.  Not much luck.  It could have been a video game -- it was really frustrating.

I was already "too old" to serve, but I understand the feelings that inspired so many young men and women to enlist in the armed forces.  We were all so pissed off.

I am an eternal sunshine pumper, and I actually took hope that the "across the aisle" consensus might last.  What a dumbass I was.

My kids were around that age.  They could not understand what had happened, but I did my best.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Buscemi is an old soul.  Watch him in interviews -- he doesn't want any conferred glory about those days.  It had been his job, and he returned to that job because he was more qualified than most.  That was it.  He would have been handing out sandwiches and water and doing whatever else otherwise.  Just a good dude doing what he could.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, jimmyjazz said:

Buscemi is an old soul.  Watch him in interviews -- he doesn't want any conferred glory about those days.  It had been his job, and he returned to that job because he was more qualified than most.  That was it.  He would have been handing out sandwiches and water and doing whatever else otherwise.  Just a good dude doing what he could.

Amen. Great dude. Although I disagree with his policy on tipping.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

From the "where were you" files- what a weird day.  This was 2 years pre kids, and 3 years pre boat.  But I had a buddy who had the same model boat I ended up getting.  He used to let my wife and I take it for a week each year to Catalina.  We arrived on Monday the 10th.  I got up early on the 11th and went kayak fishing.  Around 7:30 am pacific, I look over and my wife is waving at me to come back to the boat.  At first I sort of wave her off, but she is pretty animated.  I figure something is wrong with the boat so I paddle back.  She begins to tell me that it sounds like the WTC is down.  I was like "wtf are you talking about?"  She said the Pentagon has been hit, and the WTC has collapsed.  We only have radio, so we are listening and our minds cannot fathom what we are hearing.  After about an hour we decide we need to see what is going on and we jump in the dinghy and go about 2 miles to Two Harbors to get in front of a TV.  At this point it's all replays, but we are floored.  We are mesmerized, but after awhile, we stop and ask ourselves, "now what?"  It was the first full day of a week planned out there.  Do we stay?  Do we go home?  I call my boss and he says the plan is for the company to stay closed all week, so no point in coming home.  So we make the most of it.  Head to Avalon and try to stay abreast of the goings on.  But the ceased all ferry service to the island, only taking people off of it.  So after a day or 2, it was a ghost town.  Pretty surreal.  We tried to enjoy ourselves, but it was tough.  Bizarro world. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, Sbbruin said:

From the "where were you" files- what a weird day.  This was 2 years pre kids, and 3 years pre boat.  But I had a buddy who had the same model boat I ended up getting.  He used to let my wife and I take it for a week each year to Catalina.  We arrived on Monday the 10th.  I got up early on the 11th and went kayak fishing.  Around 7:30 am pacific, I look over and my wife is waving at me to come back to the boat.  At first I sort of wave her off, but she is pretty animated.  I figure something is wrong with the boat so I paddle back.  She begins to tell me that it sounds like the WTC is down.  I was like "wtf are you talking about?"  She said the Pentagon has been hit, and the WTC has collapsed.  We only have radio, so we are listening and our minds cannot fathom what we are hearing.  After about an hour we decide we need to see what is going on and we jump in the dinghy and go about 2 miles to Two Harbors to get in front of a TV.  At this point it's all replays, but we are floored.  We are mesmerized, but after awhile, we stop and ask ourselves, "now what?"  It was the first full day of a week planned out there.  Do we stay?  Do we go home?  I call my boss and he says the plan is for the company to stay closed all week, so no point in coming home.  So we make the most of it.  Head to Avalon and try to stay abreast of the goings on.  But the ceased all ferry service to the island, only taking people off of it.  So after a day or 2, it was a ghost town.  Pretty surreal.  We tried to enjoy ourselves, but it was tough.  Bizarro world. 

Look, I know this is a day of somber memories, but did you get laid that week or what?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The wife called me on my way to work about the first plane.  Got to the office and watched the reporting and the second plane hit.  I was in the waiting room of a doctor's office watching when the first building collapsed.

We did the Marine Corps Marathon in October of 2001.  It was the first week that flights resumed to Reagan National.  Before the plane took off, the pilot told the passengers that everyone had to remain in their seats the last 30 minutes of the flight.  Of course, some dipshit decided to go to the bathroom and the plane was about 30 seconds from being diverted to Dulles.  The approach to land was the steepest approach you could imagine - felt almost like a nose-dive free fall.

The marathon course ran through Crystal City and at one point directly into the side of the Pentagon that had been destroyed.  It was impossible not to shed a tear running along the same route the doomed plane flew and seeing the destruction of the building.

We went back to DC ten years later and did the Nation's Triathlon on Sept. 11, 2011.  All of the museums had tributes to 9/11 and it was cathartic to go to the 9/11 memorial at the Pentagon. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

38 minutes ago, South Austin said:

Agreed.  It's like you're walking down into a crypt.  There are so many haunting pieces preserved from the wreckage that day -- filing cabinets, watches, ID cards.  And all around you are television screens replaying the news of the day, making it seem more like you're thrown back into time.  Like someone else said, the best and worst of humanity are presented in that museum.

Concur 100%.  Shed more than one tear during my visit earlier this year.  It might sound weird saying it is very well done, but it is.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The whole country was so on edge afterwards. I remember how hearing airplanes flyover at night used to wake me and my wife up at night the following week after 9/11 and we were way over here in Texas. I can't even imagine what life was like afterwards for the people that were in NYC at the time.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

qr7ooxxubll11.jpg

 

http://edition.cnn.com/2010/US/09/10/september.11.photo/index.html

 

Quote

New York (CNN) -- Judson Box has never known exactly how his son, Gary, died on September 11, 2001. But an unexpected find nine years later has given him a glimpse into his son's final hours.

Gary, then 35, had been working as a firefighter in Brooklyn for roughly five years when the terrorists attacked. He did not speak to his father the day of the attack and his body was never recovered, leaving the circumstances of his death a mystery.

On September 11, 2009, Gary's sister, Christine, was visiting the Tribute Center when an employee asked her if she was looking for someone specifically. She mentioned her brother Gary, and the employee showed her to a picture of a firefighter in the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel that had a caption bearing Gary's name.

But it was not Gary. It was a photo of Brian Bilcher, another member of Gary's fire squad who also perished on 9/11.

The discovery compelled Gary's father to dig deeper, clinging to the possibility that there could be a similar picture of his son out there.

Box scoured photo archives of the National 9/11 Museum and the memorial's website, which allows users to upload photos from 9/11 directly to the site.

After searching one night for more than five hours, Box went to sleep, physically and emotionally exhausted. The next morning, his wife, Helen, called him into the living room as he was eating breakfast.

She showed him a photo of a firefighter running through the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel toward the Towers alongside cars stuck in traffic.

This time, it was Gary.

"I was out of out control, emotionally," Box said. "Thanking God, being so happy that I had something to see."

Eager for more answers, Box contacted the National 9/11 Museum and Memorial in an attempt to track down the photographer. Several months later, the museum gave him the e-mail address of Erik Troelson, a Danish businessman who was stranded in the tunnel on his way to a meeting when he snapped the picture of Gary.

Having entered the tunnel before the first plane hit, Troelson was unaware of the tragedy that was taking place outside.

"Suddenly, the girl in the car in front of us got out crying," he said. "Then we turned on the radio and heard the events as they unfolded."

Soon after, firetrucks started racing through the tunnel, but a car with blown-out tires jammed traffic, he said.

"Some of the bigger trucks got stuck, so the guys started walking briskly past us," Troelson said. "Gary Box was one of the guys."

Box and Troelson corresponded via e-mail for months, with Troelson doing his best to recall the day's timeline of events.

On Tuesday, the National 9/11 Museum and Memorial foundation arranged for a surprise rendezvous between the men at their annual fundraiser.

They shared an emotional moment onstage. Afterward, they spoke at length, with Box expressing his gratitude.

"I think I said about 300 times thank you and God bless you, that's all I could say," Box said. "I think I told him I love you, and I don't tell anybody that."

Nine years after September 11, Box said he still feels the pain of that day. He doesn't have the means to make large donations to the museum, but has sought to promote their cause through his story.

"We need that in this country because too many people forget," Box said of the museum.

"I wish everybody could get what I got."

 

Edited by crash_davis
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's a weird day.

I took the train this morning and it didn't even register that it was 9/11 despite working within a 5 minute walk of the WTC. Other than the traditional reading of names on a TV playing in the background of a show shine shop, you'd never know what happened. No one in the office has mentioned it, no one on the LIRR or subway said anything and there's no parade or gathering in the Canyon of Heroes on Broadway. It's just another gray, damp New York Tuesday.

Life has moved on.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was at work early on the 18th floor of 1 Allen Center in Houston.  Doing a quick check of the news.   Saw a headline about a plane crashing into one of the towers.  A few weeks before, there had been stories about a small plane crashing into an office building somewhere, so my first thought was "dumb fucking small plane pilots".  clicked the link and nothing happened.  Tried another link..nothing.  It was like the internet was broken.  Shortly thereafter they opened up the conference room and on the big screen display as a TV.  I walked in just before the tower collapsed.   Knees felt weak and just sank down into a chair with my mouth open .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, Spankytoes said:

It's a weird day.

I took the train this morning and it didn't even register that it was 9/11 despite working within a 5 minute walk of the WTC. Other than the traditional reading of names on a TV playing in the background of a show shine shop, you'd never know what happened. No one in the office has mentioned it, no one on the LIRR or subway said anything and there's no parade or gathering in the Canyon of Heroes on Broadway. It's just another gray, damp New York Tuesday.

Life has moved on.

Sometimes, letting wounds heal is the best policy. Ripping open the bandages doesn't let them heal.

9/11 will always be more impactful for those who were directly affected. As a nation, we don't need parades or gatherings. We need to be resolved.

Edited by Cheeseweasel
fuck my edit button
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, F250 said:

The whole country was so on edge afterwards. I remember how hearing airplanes flyover at night used to wake me and my wife up at night the following week after 9/11 and we were way over here in Texas. I can't even imagine what life was like afterwards for the people that were in NYC at the time.

 

re: being on edge...we went to Port A with some friends on 9/13 (pre-planned). i swear every other balcony at Port Royal had an American flag hanging, everybody was so subdued. 

on the beach, coast guard and navy helicopters kept flying up and down the coast, like every 30 minutes. it was surreal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I almost got in a fight on a plane less than a month after 9/11.  At the time, the policy was that everyone had to be in their assigned seat with the windows open on takeoff.  Some jackass and his whore wife just had to move seats before takeoff (the plane was 70% full).  They held everyone up until they finally moved back to their seats.  I made a loud smartass remark about how it must suck to have to move further back in the plane because they'll get there so much later than everyone else.  He glared at me as he moved to his seat.  After takeoff, they moved back to the seats closer to the front.  Again, I loudly commented that everyone can rest easy since "they" are back in their spot and will get there faster than everyone else.  We had a stewardess that was deadheading back to California sitting with us and she thanked me for saying something because she couldn't.  Anyway, the plane lands and the guy gets up and takes a step towards me.  I had to bend over to get out from under the overhead bin and when I stood up, he took one look and turned around (not that I'm that big, but he was a manlet).  I heard a snickering behind me and a soldier in fatigues said that if he had taken one more step, he was coming over my shoulder and would have immensely enjoyed beating the shit out of him.

Tldr...some jackasses just gonna jackass.

 

It was weird walking through the airports with National Guard in full combat gear carrying rifles.   

Edited by Catpfish
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, Catpfish said:

I almost got in a fight on a plane less than a month after 9/11.  At the time, the policy was that everyone had to be in their assigned seat with the windows open on takeoff.  Some jackass and his whore wife just had to move seats before takeoff (the plane was 70% full).  They held everyone up until they finally moved back to their seats.  I made a loud smartass remark about how it must suck to have to move further back in the plane because they'll get there so much later than everyone else.  He glared at me as he moved to his seat.  After takeoff, they moved back to the seats closer to the front.  Again, I loudly commented that everyone can rest easy since "they" are back in their spot and will get there faster than everyone else.  We had a stewardess that was deadheading back to California sitting with us and she thanked me for saying something because she couldn't.  Anyway, the plane lands and the guy gets up and takes a step towards me.  I had to bend over to get out from under the overhead bin and when I stood up, he took one look and turned around (not that I'm that big, but he was a manlet).  I heard a snickering behind me and a soldier in fatigues said that if he had taken one more step, he was coming over my shoulder and would have immensely enjoyed beating the shit out of him.

Tldr...some jackasses just gonna jackass.

 

It was weird walking through the airports with National Guard in full combat gear carrying rifles.   

Divided we fall.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, Wally Pryor said:

Lost of good documentaries done in the wake of 9-11.  None of them are uplifting, but many are very interesting.   The Falling Man tops the list for me.   

I saw some of 9/11, the French brothers' deal, but that's it.  I haven't seen Flight 93, or Falling Man, or any of that.  Don't want to.

I watched it unfold live.  I sat glued to the TV for nearly a week.  I burned with rage for years.  No thanks.  I don't need to see any of that again.  I saw plenty as it happened.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, mchookem said:

re: being on edge...we went to Port A with some friends on 9/13 (pre-planned). i swear every other balcony at Port Royal had an American flag hanging, everybody was so subdued. 

on the beach, coast guard and navy helicopters kept flying up and down the coast, like every 30 minutes. it was surreal.

After basically three whole days of doing nothing, a buddy and I decided to go shoot pool on Thursday night 9/13.  I will never forget that, walking into this place. It was packed.... way more people than should have been in this shitty strip mall pool hall on an early Thursday evening. But what I remember most was the sound in there. For as many people were in the place, how quiet it was. It hit me right away how unusual the vibe was in there.

It's like everyone just finally decided "fuck it, I have to get out of the house" but certainly no one was ready to be partying yet.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, crash_davis said:

The Tunnel to Towers Run was started by the family of Stephen Siller, a Firefighter with Brooklyn's Squad 1 who had gotten off shift that morning. Hwas on his way home in the tunnel when he heard about the towers being hit on the radio. Traffic was standstill. He threw his gear on his back and raced back through the tunnel to the towers downtown. He, along with the others in this pic, were all killed that morning.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              

I didn't have to work that day and I had slept in that morning.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   I woke around 730 am Pacific and was hoping to catch the latter half of Sportcenter to check the baseball scores. Upon turning on the TV, ...ALL that was on (every channel) were the buildings on fire. Reading the ticker at the bottom of the tv screen, it kept saying that the WTC towers had collapsed. It took a few minutes to realize that buildings being shown standing were from earlier (taped) reports.....Immediately I wondered how many people and Firefighters had perished.                                                                                                                                                                            

At the time of the attacks, I had been a Firefighter in Tacoma for just over 13 years.                                                                                                                                                                    We were used to getting cookies and cakes at Christmas but the following day,  Sept.12 was overwhelming. Our shift was inundated with citizens dropping food off. This went on for weeks, people just wanted to Thank us for what others had done......We took most of the food to the different food banks in town.                                                                                                                                                                            RIP Brothers. 343. Never Forgotten.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It should come as no real surprise that I work in an actual cave.

That morning I got up and was pulling on my boots and watching GMA. They knew that a plane had flown into the fist tower and were speculating on the whole thing, and I was thinking that it was likely a small plane with a suicidal pilot. They showed the tower then, and since I have never been to NYC and seen how BIG the towers were, that only confirmed my thinking. Some little plane. Right. So I clicked off the TV and went to work.

As I was heading down into the cave, one of our receptionists came in and told me that BOTH towers had been hit by airliners. I told her that she was full of crap (which was usually true) and went underground. I'd been down there working for a little while when one of our employees came through and said that the Pentagon had been hit.

Shortly afterward, a tour came through the cave. I still hadn't seen a TV, and I said the lamest, stupidest thing to the tourists: "Welcome to apparently the safest place in America right now," meaning the cave of course. They all gave me blank stares.

I got out of the cave and into the visitor center as just as the first tower fell. My overwhelming feeling was sadness. Not just for that day and all of the people affected, but because I knew deep down that the United States of America was going to war somewhere. We didn't know where at the time, but I knew with total certainty that we would and that when we did, a whole lot more people would die.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, TornACL said:

After basically three whole days of doing nothing, a buddy and I decided to go shoot pool on Thursday night 9/13.  I will never forget that, walking into this place. It was packed.... way more people than should have been in this shitty strip mall pool hall on an early Thursday evening. But what I remember most was the sound in there. For as many people were in the place, how quiet it was. It hit me right away how unusual the vibe was in there.

It's like everyone just finally decided "fuck it, I have to get out of the house" but certainly no one was ready to be partying yet.

I remember that feeling.  Wife at the time and I just were numb, living in Addison and just had the tv on all day.  Just had to get out of the house.  I remember going to some bar and it was pretty tame.  People were just trying to get away from what had happened.  Then on the tv some group was signing God Bless America and the bartender turned it up really loud.  The whole place just got silent and very dusty.  I just remember thinking I came here to escape this for just a few hours and there was just no escaping it at all.

I wasn't in NYC, I know nobody that was affected directly by 9/11, however it still chokes me up even to this day.  I have been to the memorial it is very moving.  

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had flown down from states on 9/10 (via NYC) and was back in Brazil on 9/11. Remember being at the office and how just angry I was at what I was seeing.

The reactions of my co-workers (I was lone American) ranged from shock/sadness to "Well the US always meddles so what do they expect?".

Just one of the weirdest days of my life. My now wife (no pics) and I got engaged shortly before in NYC and had dinner at the restaurant on top of the towers.

Such a crazy day and will be one that I will never forget.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not much else to add. I was running late to work that day. Saw the second plane hit just as I was about to turn off the TV. I flipped it off not processing. Jumped in the car for about the 20 minute drive to work. I knew that something was up by how distracted George Craig and Gordon were by it on the Ticket. By the time got up to my office CNN.com wouldn’t come up and I knew then it was bad.

Pentagon hit is what really gave me the shiver down the spine.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

√ó
√ó
  • Create New...