Jump to content

Grant Wahl drops dead


Brisketexan
 Share

Recommended Posts

His brother just posted saying he believes he was killed. Grant was wearing rainbow shirts (in support of his gay brother) and was getting death threats.

Fuck Qatar!!!!

https://www.instagram.com/reel/Cl-JMepju1-/?igshid=YWJhMjlhZTc=


Edit. I didn’t read article, I now see the brother stuff is in there.

Way fucked up if any of that is true. This is truly shocking.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

First off RIP I liked Grant a lot. I thought he was knowledgeable and a great writer. I also thought despite taking a lot of shit he busted his ass. And people were really dumb, because he did know his stuff.

 

I really hope this was just was a coincidence and that he wasn’t killed. He was a good dude and Qatar can go fuck itself. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

here is today's substack article and his final published work:

+++

Day 25

DOHA, Qatar — They just don’t care.

The Supreme Committee in charge of Qatar’s World Cup doesn’t care that a Filipino migrant worker died at Saudi Arabia’s training resort during the group stage. He suffered a fatal blow to the head during a fall in a forklift accident (information that was kept under wraps until being broken by The Athletic’s Adam Crafton).

We know the Qatari Supreme Committee doesn’t care because its CEO, Nasser Al-Khater, told you all you needed to hear in an interview with the BBC that was breathtaking in its crassness.

“We’re in the middle of a World Cup, and we have a successful World Cup. And this is something that you want to talk about right now?” Al-Khater said when asked about the worker’s death. “I mean, death is a natural part of life, whether it’s at work, whether it’s in your sleep. Of course, a worker died. Our condolences go to his family. However, it’s strange that this is something that you wanted to focus on as your first question.”

He actually said that. But Al-Khater didn’t stop there.

“Everything that has been said and everything that has been reflected about worker deaths here has been absolutely false,” he said. “This theme, this negativity around the World Cup, has been something that we’ve been faced with, unfortunately. We are a bit disappointed that the journalists have been exacerbating this false narrative, and honestly I think a lot of the journalists have to question themselves and reflect on why they’ve been trying to bang on about the subject for so long.”

Just think of the context in which Al-Khater said this. A migrant worker died here during the World Cup. If I was a family member of the worker who died, I can’t imagine how I would feel. 

Al-Khater and the Qataris really do see themselves as the victims here, and not what they really are: The rich and powerful petrobarons who have built an empire in the desert on the backs of far too many migrant workers who have been treated poorly and, yes, have died.

How many have died? We’ll never know for sure, in part because Qatar hasn’t cared enough to document the losses. 

Last year, The Guardian’s Pete Pattisson cited government sources to report that more than 6,500 migrant workers had died in Qatar in the decade since the country was awarded the World Cup in 2010. (A total of 40 deaths have been tied to World Cup stadium construction, though nearly all of Qatar’s infrastructure growth has some connection to the World Cup.) 

Qatari officials claim the migrant mortality rate is within the expected range given the workforce size, but experts Amnesty International spoke to were skeptical of that claim because the data on migrant deaths is of such low quality.

Meanwhile, Amnesty says Qatar has failed to properly investigate up to 70 percent of its migrant worker deaths, noting that “in a well-resourced health system, it should be possible to identify the exact cause of death in all but 1 percent of cases.”

When a country fails to take the time to properly investigate up to 70 percent of its migrant worker deaths, that’s a sign: They just don’t care.

Last week, the general secretary of the Supreme Committee, Hassan Al-Thawadi, told Piers Morgan on his TV show that “between 400 and 500” migrant workers have died on World Cup-related projects. A Supreme Committee spokesperson later said those numbers referred to national statistics for all work-related deaths in Qatar from 2014 to 2020.

On Friday, FIFA general secretary Fatma Samoura didn’t look good either evading questions on the Filipino worker’s death at the Saudi camp:

 

Open in app or online

World Cup Daily, Day 25

They just don't care. Qatari World Cup organizers don't even hide their apathy over migrant worker deaths, including the most recent one.

Grant Wahl

Dec 8

 

 

Paid

 


 

Save

 

▷  Listen

 


 

“Death is a natural part of life, whether it’s at work, whether it’s in your sleep.”

DOHA, Qatar — They just don’t care.

The Supreme Committee in charge of Qatar’s World Cup doesn’t care that a Filipino migrant worker died at Saudi Arabia’s training resort during the group stage. He suffered a fatal blow to the head during a fall in a forklift accident (information that was kept under wraps until being broken by The Athletic’s Adam Crafton).

We know the Qatari Supreme Committee doesn’t care because its CEO, Nasser Al-Khater, told you all you needed to hear in an interview with the BBC that was breathtaking in its crassness.

“We’re in the middle of a World Cup, and we have a successful World Cup. And this is something that you want to talk about right now?” Al-Khater said when asked about the worker’s death. “I mean, death is a natural part of life, whether it’s at work, whether it’s in your sleep. Of course, a worker died. Our condolences go to his family. However, it’s strange that this is something that you wanted to focus on as your first question.”

He actually said that. But Al-Khater didn’t stop there. 

GrantWahl.com is reader-supported. Free and paid subscriptions are available. This is how I make a living, and quality journalism and traveling to Qatar require resources. The best way to support me and my work is by taking out a paid subscription now.

Upgrade to Paid

Give a gift subscription

“Everything that has been said and everything that has been reflected about worker deaths here has been absolutely false,” he said. “This theme, this negativity around the World Cup, has been something that we’ve been faced with, unfortunately. We are a bit disappointed that the journalists have been exacerbating this false narrative, and honestly I think a lot of the journalists have to question themselves and reflect on why they’ve been trying to bang on about the subject for so long.”

Just think of the context in which Al-Khater said this. A migrant worker died here during the World Cup. If I was a family member of the worker who died, I can’t imagine how I would feel. 

othernine @othernine

Jesus Christ! 🤦🏻‍♂️ “Death is a natural part of life, whether it’s at work or in your sleep…”

12:30 PM ∙ Dec 8, 2022

562Likes185Retweets

Dan Roan @danroan

“Workers' deaths has been a big subject during the World Cup..a lot of journalists have to reflect on why they've been trying to bang on about [it] for so long." Qatar 2022 chief Nasser Al Khater when asked today about a migrant worker's death ⬇️ bbc.co.uk/sport/football…

3:19 PM ∙ Dec 8, 2022

28Likes18Retweets

Al-Khater and the Qataris really do see themselves as the victims here, and not what they really are: The rich and powerful petrobarons who have built an empire in the desert on the backs of far too many migrant workers who have been treated poorly and, yes, have died.

How many have died? We’ll never know for sure, in part because Qatar hasn’t cared enough to document the losses. 

Last year, The Guardian’s Pete Pattisson cited government sources to report that more than 6,500 migrant workers had died in Qatar in the decade since the country was awarded the World Cup in 2010. (A total of 40 deaths have been tied to World Cup stadium construction, though nearly all of Qatar’s infrastructure growth has some connection to the World Cup.) 

Qatari officials claim the migrant mortality rate is within the expected range given the workforce size, but experts Amnesty International spoke to were skeptical of that claim because the data on migrant deaths is of such low quality.

Meanwhile, Amnesty says Qatar has failed to properly investigate up to 70 percent of its migrant worker deaths, noting that “in a well-resourced health system, it should be possible to identify the exact cause of death in all but 1 percent of cases.”

When a country fails to take the time to properly investigate up to 70 percent of its migrant worker deaths, that’s a sign: They just don’t care.

Last week, the general secretary of the Supreme Committee, Hassan Al-Thawadi, told Piers Morgan on his TV show that “between 400 and 500” migrant workers have died on World Cup-related projects. A Supreme Committee spokesperson later said those numbers referred to national statistics for all work-related deaths in Qatar from 2014 to 2020.

On Friday, FIFA general secretary Fatma Samoura didn’t look good either evading questions on the Filipino worker’s death at the Saudi camp:

Neil Barker @Mockneyrebel

"I don't think that's appropriate...sorry, goodbye!" FIFA General Secretary @fatma_samoura refuses to answer questions on a migrant worker dying at the #KSA training complex during the #FIFAWorldCup (as reported by @TheAthleticFC) Q.s - @iainaxon

10:00 AM ∙ Dec 8, 2022

24Likes7Retweets

Let me be clear here: Covering a worker’s death, covering issues of human rights and this World Cup, isn’t a sign of being anti-Islamic. The Middle East deserved to host a World Cup at some point. And Western countries have all sorts of their own problems. But this World Cup has been a human rights disaster. My friend Musa Okwonga got it right in a tweet thread more than a month ago:

Today we saw the evidence right in front of us from the CEO of the Qatari Supreme Committee organizing the World Cup. A worker died, and they just don’t care.

  • Hook 'Em 3
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yep no reason to do anything extra other play a recording when one of the leading members covering the USMNT dies suddenly. 

“Hey guys it’s 7:02am…get out of your hotel room and down to the set because news broke an hour ago concerning a popular American journalist dying after doing some controversial shit. Get on the air and say stuff. But watch what you say because you could be next….”
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 minutes ago, MNLonghornFUKM said:


“Hey guys it’s 7:02am…get out of your hotel room and down to the set because news broke an hour ago concerning a popular American journalist dying after doing some controversial shit. Get on the air and say stuff. But watch what you say because you could be next….”

Umm this shit happened during the Argentina Netherlands game not 10 minutes ago. USMNT media people have been tweeting about this for hours you moron. Sit down please

  • Hook 'Em 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Umm this shit happened during the Argentina Netherlands game not 10 minutes ago. USMNT media people have been tweeting about this for hours you moron. Sit down please

. Can you post those tweets? Anything from official USMNT regarding wahls death is an hr old.

What on fucking earth can fox analysts say live on air? They certainly can’t say what we are.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My 3 Thoughts on USMNT-Netherlands

Grant Wahl

Dec 3

Denzel Dumfries was the Man of the Match, providing a goal and two assists, as the Netherlands eliminated the U.S. from the World Cup with a 3-1 victory (Photo by Matthew Ashton - AMA/Getty Images)

DOHA, Qatar — The USMNT lost to the Netherlands 3-1 in the World Cup Round of 16 on Saturday. The U.S. exits the tournament, while the Netherlands advances to the quarterfinals to meet Argentina or Australia. Here are my three thoughts on the game:

• The U.S. looked like an exhausted team, and the Netherlands took advantage of it. It’s a shame Christian Pulisic didn’t convert on a golden scoring chance in the third minute of the game. Had he done so, the U.S. would have gotten off to the perfect start, a start that would have put something tangible behind the possession advantage the U.S. had the entire first half. But goalkeeper Andries Noppert made the stop—in a play reminiscent of Oliver Kahn on Landon Donovan early in the 2002 quarterfinal against Germany—and the Dutch scored two very similar-looking first-half goals in which Memphis Depay and Daley Blind ran into the box uncovered to put away identical passes from Denzel Dumfries. (The third Dutch goal, by Dumfries, came together differently but was similar in that Dumfries was wide open in the box.) Why were the Dutch scorers uncovered? Because the U.S.’s collective defense, which had been so good in this tournament, was exhausted both physically and mentally. Nine U.S. players started all four games of this compact-schedule World Cup, and you wish there might have been some more use of depth there, because a toll was taken. Tyler Adams, who almost never looks tired, looked that way today. On the first goal, he lost track of Memphis and wasn’t able to catch up, and Yunus Musah didn’t slip over to cover. On the second Dutch goal, Sergiño Dest didn’t mark Blind closely enough. With these games coming so fast and furious, coach Gregg Berhalter has been asking a lot of his midfield trio (Adams, Musah, Weston McKennie) in this World Cup, and Adams and Musah finally lost their edge tonight. The Dutch are a good team, and they made the U.S. pay for it.

• I will never figure out the use of Gio Reyna in this World Cup. The 20-year-old American has started three of Borussia Dortmund’s six Champions League games so far this season. He makes an attacking impact in the Champions League at the highest level of the sport. He has been healthy here. And yet Berhalter did not use Reyna at all against Wales and Iran, brought him on for just seven minutes against England and didn’t start him against the Netherlands. Only when the U.S. was down 2-0 at halftime and desperate for goals did Berhalter sub Reyna in for Jesús Ferreira at the No. 9 spot. Look, Berhalter has been pretty good with his tactics overall in this tournament. But it has also been a running talking point that it would have been preferable to have your best attacking players on the field and put, say, Weah at centerforward to give yourself a chance to use Reyna or Brenden Aaronson from the start out wide. There’s no real chance that Reyna could have gone 90 or 120 minutes tonight, but he could have started and given 75 minutes, and I just don’t understand why Berhalter wouldn’t have done that prior to being forced to after 45 minutes today. Berhalter’s use of Reyna will one of the talking points that always defines World Cup 2022 for the USMNT.

• This World Cup exit hurts tremendously, but it will lead to increased excitement around a young USMNT heading into co-hosting the World Cup in 2026. We’ll have plenty more to say about this in the postmortems over the coming days, but an extremely young U.S. team here—it had the youngest average starting lineup of any team in the World Cup—should only get better in the coming four years as it gains experience and (one hopes) new emerging stars on it. Being a host country in 2026 will increase the expectations that the U.S. should be able to make a deep run in that World Cup and help take the sport to the next level in America. Will Berhalter be the coach? That remains to be seen. My read on Berhalter’s boss, Earnie Stewart, is that he hired Berhalter in the first place and will look at a run to the knockout rounds here as enough evidence to stick with Berhalter for the next four years. But Stewart won’t be the only one making that decision. U.S. Soccer’s board will have an influence, too. My own research has suggested that World Cup coaches tend not to do better in their second cycles than they do in their first. Whoever the coach ends up being, though, this U.S. team has a ton of potential. There is talent there. They need a better No. 9 (so do a lot of countries, including Germany), more goal-scoring threats and a deeper base of reliable talent that includes every sub coming into a game. We didn’t totally see that here. But there’s also a decent chance that historically this U.S. World Cup will be seen as a key building block for what happens in 2026.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

25 minutes ago, MNLonghornFUKM said:


. Can you post those tweets? Anything from official USMNT regarding wahls death is an hr old.

What on fucking earth can fox analysts say live on air? They certainly can’t say what we are.

 

He had to take an UBER! to the hospital 

 

 

SHIT HOLE COUNTRY 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I’m going to give the on air talent a break as I think some of them may have been good friends with Grant.  I wouldn’t want to do a show in the middle of the night doing a work friend/colleague eulogy either.  The online fox sports has it.  I’ll wait to see how it’s handled pregame for the next match.

Maybe I’m just being naïve or hoping for the best - but I think this may just coincidence.  And I really hope I’m right.

 

  • Hook 'Em 1
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

“my upper chest take on a new level of pressure and discomfort."

Fuck I read that and hoped they got a cardiac consult in.  Not just ‘here’s some abx and cough syrup’.  But it’s shithole country that likely hated this guy anyways.  Hope my hunch is wrong but I think someone dropped the ball on purpose and we may never know.  Fuck Qatar. 

  • Hook 'Em 2
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...