Jump to content

McDouble is 'cheapest and most nutritious food in human history'


Recommended Posts

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddrink/10210327/McDouble-is-cheapest-and-most-nutritious-food-in-human-history.html

Describing the McDonald’s double cheeseburger as “the cheapest, most nutritious, and bountiful food that has ever existed in human history” might seem beyond fanciful, but according to the author of Freakonomics, it is not as absurd a suggestion as it appears.

While describing the McDonald’s double cheeseburger as “the cheapest, most nutritious, and bountiful food that has ever existed in human history” might seem beyond fanciful, according to the author behind Freakonomics, it is not as absurd a suggestion as it appears.

Stephen Dubner, who co-authored the best-selling book, hosted a debate on his blog after a reader suggested the McDouble packed a better nutritional punch for the penny than is often assumed.

The double cheeseburger provides 390 calories, 23 grams of protein – half a daily serving – seven per cent of daily fibre, 19 grams of fat and 20 per cent of daily calcium, all for between $1 and $2, or 65p and £1.30, The Times reported.

Kyle Smith, a New York Post columnist, threw his support behind the McDouble’s nutritional value for money.

“For the average poor person, it isn’t a great option to take a trip to the farmers market to puzzle over esoteric lefty-foodie codes”, Mr Smith wrote.

“Facts are facts – where else but McDonald’s can poor people obtain so many calories per dollar?”

Mr Dubner added: “The more I thought about the question, whether the McDouble is the cheapest, most bountiful, and nutritious food ever, the more I realised how you answer that question says a lot about how you see the world, not only our food system and the economics of it, but even social justice.”

A 2007 University of Washington survey found that while junk food costs as little as $1.76 per 1,000 calories, fresh vegetables and healthier foods can cost more than 10 times as much.

In the online debate, some farmers suggested the McDonalds burger deserved more credit for feeding the poor cheaply.

Blake Hurst, president of the Missouri Farm Bureau, said: “The biggest unreported story in the past three quarters of a century [is] this increase in availability of food for the common person.”

But Tom Philpott, a campaigning organic farmer from North Carolina, said there were many more nutritious ways of feeding people cheaply.

“You can get a pound of organic brown rice and a pound of red lentils for about £1.30 each”, Mr Philpott said.

“A serving of each of those things would be around 48 pence.

“In order to present to us all that burger, you’re talking about a vast army of working poor people.”

Link to post
Share on other sites

Seems like rice and beans would be cheaper.  One can eat healthy food cheap.  Frozen veggies are cheap and healthy.  Bananas are cheap.  Ground meat is cheap.  Hell, you can get a rotisserie chicken from Walmart for $6, some rice and beans, and frozen broccoli and feed a family of 5 for, what, $9?

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, clapclapclap said:

A 2007 University of Washington survey found that while junk food costs as little as $1.76 per 1,000 calories, fresh vegetables and healthier foods can cost more than 10 times as much. 

vegetables aren't particularly calorie dense, so, no duh.  try eating 1,000 calories of broccoli. 

Edited by elfenix
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Johnny Sack said:

Seems like rice and beans would be cheaper.  One can eat healthy food cheap.  Frozen veggies are cheap and healthy.  Bananas are cheap.  Ground meat is cheap.  Hell, you can get a rotisserie chicken from Walmart for $6, some rice and beans, and frozen broccoli and feed a family of 5 for, what, $9?

Exactly this. I would imagine beans are the biggest bang for your buck.

Edited by SimonBolivar
Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Incredulity said:

It is absolutely true.

 

but, but..... food desert, supersize me, obesity epidemic,.....

 

 

Not, it's not.

 

1 pound of white rice = $0.71 dollars

I pound of red lentils = $1.79 

Total Cost = $2.50 dollars

1 pound of rice  = 2 1/4 to 2 1/2 cups uncooked = 11 cups cooked (Will serve 11 people).

11 meals for one person divided by $2.50

0.22 per meal

calories in 1 cup of cooked rice = 200 calories

grams of protein in 1 cup of cooked rice = 4.3 grams

calories in 1 cup of cooked lentils = 230 calories 

grams of protein in 1 cup of cooked lentils = 18 grams

430 calories & 22.3 grams of protein per meail @ 22 cents

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Blake Hurst, president of the Missouri Farm Bureau, said: “The biggest unreported story in the past three quarters of a century [is] this increase in availability of food for the common person.”

This is more to the point I was trying to reinforce.  Not the exact dollars and cents per calorie..

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

There are 100 ways to get better nutrition than the McDouble for cheaper.  For example, from HEB I can get:

  • 3 eggs (hardboiled)  = 234 cal, 18 g protein, 1.5 g carbs, 15 g fat = $0.45
  • 8 oz milk = 148 cal, 8 g protein, 12 g carbs, 8 g fat = $0.14
  • 2 slices whole wheat toast = 120 cal, 6 g protein, 22 g carbs, 2 g fat = $0.17
  • -----------------------------------------------------
  • Total = 502 cal, 36 g protein, 36 g carbs, 25 g fat = $0.76
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, HookEm said:

There are 100 ways to get better nutrition than the McDouble for cheaper.  For example, from HEB I can get:

  • 3 eggs (hardboiled)  = 234 cal, 18 g protein, 1.5 g carbs, 15 g fat = $0.45
  • 8 oz milk = 148 cal, 8 g protein, 12 g carbs, 8 g fat = $0.14
  • 2 slices whole wheat toast = 120 cal, 6 g protein, 22 g carbs, 2 g fat = $0.17
  • -----------------------------------------------------
  • Total = 502 cal, 36 g protein, 36 g carbs, 25 g fat = $0.76

But you need to have a home to store the other 9 eggs, the other 136 oz of milk, and the other part of your loaf of bread.

Then you have to have access to electricity or gas to cook the food, and refrigerate the unused milk.

So costs of all of that may be unobtainable to the truly poor, or the homeless.

 

Or you can be homeless and scrounge a couple of bucks and get a McDouble. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

if poor people got a mcdouble for a meal and no more that might be healthy.  unfortunately they’d rather spend 6-7 bucks for a value meal and about 2500 calories and they end up fat, diabetic and stupid.  

let’s not discuss the healthcare costs of our hordes of fat fucks. 

Edited by futureman
Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah well, I guess it's better than going to a farmers market and letting some high classed farmer take your wallet for a ride. I'd still rather roll the dice with brown rice, carrots, broccoli and chicken, take the time to cook, than to eat a cheeseburger from McDonald's.

Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, futureman said:

if poor people got a mcdouble for a meal and no more that might be healthy.  unfortunately they’d rather spend 6-7 bucks for a value meal and about 2500 calories and they end up fat, diabetic and stupid.  

let’s not discuss the healthcare costs of our hordes of fat fucks. 

Those fat hordes have led to advances in medicine and they take themselves out of the work force. Advantage fat horde.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Johnny Sack said:

Hell, you can get a rotisserie chicken from Walmart for $6, some rice and beans, and frozen broccoli and feed a family of 5 for, what, $9?

Yeah but then you have to eat rotisserie chicken from Walmart with rice and beans and frozen broccoli. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank goodness somebody is addressing the terrible problem we have in America of not consuming enough calories! 

Who knew you could get fat on 7 bucks a day? We won't be a nation of emaciated scarecrows anymore!

And the good thing is that we get our kids hooked on these at about the same time they learn to talk!

 

Idiot World Ascendant 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I get it if its strictly sustainance (more specally calories) per dollar, but that is a terrible way to evaluate cost and "nutrition." But if someone is trying to sustain themselves on fucking mcdoubles, I'm certain that whatever money can be saved eis far outweighed by the cost of clogged fucking arteries, hypertension due to sodium sensitivity, and the diabeetus for those who have it. As was mentioned, rice and beans are cheaper and more "nutritious" by just about any  legitimate standard.

 

Edited by 'stache
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Incredulity said:

It is absolutely true.

 

but, but..... food desert, supersize me, obesity epidemic,.....

 

 

 

3 hours ago, Incredulity said:

This is more to the point I was trying to reinforce.  Not the exact dollars and cents per calorie..

 

This is an incredibly stupid point. A "food desert" isn't about lack of something literally to eat. Yeah, the poorest fucking neighborhoods have McDonalds and Cheetos from Dollar General nearby. The food debate in our country isn't so much third-world starvation its access to real food and not processed garbage and high fructose everything. It's why so many people in this country can be poor as shit, suffer from malnutrion, and be obese all at the same time. It's a real problem.

Edited by 'stache
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, 'stache said:

 

This is an incredibly stupid point. A "food desert" isn't about lack of something literally to eat. Yeah, the poorest fucking neighborhoods have McDonalds and Cheetos from Dollar General nearby. The food debate in our country isn't so much third-world starvation its access to real food and not processed garbage and high fructose everything. It's why so many people in this country can be poor as shit, suffer from malnutrion, and be obese all at the same time. It's a real problem.

It’s a lack of education and laziness.  Grocery stores are everywhere.  They even take food stamps.  Buy rice, beans, frozen veggies and protein. It’s cheaper than fast food. And much better for you.  

Edited by Johnny Sack
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Johnny Sack said:

It’s a lack of education and laziness.  Grocery stores are everywhere.  They even take food stamps.  Buy rice, beans, froze. veggies and protein. It’s cheaper than fast food. And much better for you.  

I agree that's a big part of it, but food deserts are a real thing. Grocery stores seem to be "everywhere" but more and more they are getting bigger and the space between them is getting further and further. Suburbanites and the middle-class in general don't feel it, but there are lots of neighborhoods and rural areas where the nearest grocery store is really far and transportation is an issue for many poor families. These are barriers to address along with better nutrition education. To write off food deserts as "hurr-durr they gots mcdonalds tho..." is incredibly stupid.

Edited by 'stache
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
I get it if its strictly sustainance (more specally calories) per dollar, but that is a terrible way to evaluate cost and "nutrition." But if someone is trying to sustain themselves on fucking mcdoubles, I'm certain that whatever money can be saved eis far outweighed by the cost of clogged fucking arteries, hypertension due to sodium sensitivity, and the diabeetus for those who have it. As was mentioned, rice and beans are cheaper and more "nutritious" by just about any  legitimate standard.
 
That's because Dubner and Freakonomics are fucking stupid. He's the click bait of economists.
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, Johnny Sack said:

It’s a lack of education and laziness.  Grocery stores are everywhere.  They even take food stamps.  Buy rice, beans, frozen veggies and protein. It’s cheaper than fast food. And much better for you.  

There are not grocery stores everywhere. That's why it's called a food desert. People are no inclined to take a bus for two hours with three transfers 10 miles away to go to a grocery store when you can get a mcdouble down the street for a buck and change.

Link to post
Share on other sites

My kids and I eat granola, yogurt and cut up fruit most mornings.  Granola is from trader joes— it’s cheap and goes a long way.  I buy plain vanilla yogurt in the quart size from HEB and cut up a handful of strawberries or add blueberries for the three of us   

Mix it up and it’s delicious.  It takes me less than two minutes to make.  And can’t cost more than $1.50 per serving.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, irishtexan said:

There are not grocery stores everywhere. That's why it's called a food desert. People are no inclined to take a bus for two hours with three transfers 10 miles away to go to a grocery store when you can get a mcdouble down the street for a buck and change.

Is there a food desert in Texas in a major city?  Where?  Because I guarantee in Houston 3 miles max radius I can find a regular or Mexican grocery store that will have anything you need.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, 'stache said:

I agree that's a big part of it, but food deserts are a real thing. Grocery stores seem to be "everywhere" but more and more they are getting bigger and the space between them is getting further and further. Suburbanites and the middle-class in general don't feel it, but there are lots of neighborhoods and rural areas where the nearest grocery store is really far and transportation is an issue for many poor families. These are barriers to address along with better nutrition education. To write off food deserts as "hurr-durr they gots mcdonalds tho..." is incredibly stupid.

I invest in real estate in some pretty shitty parts of Houston.  So I’m all over There are Mexican grocery stores everywhere.   And those stores sell everything you need.  Staples.  Great Produce.  Fresh and frozen proteins.  Dairy.  

If you do a google maps search for HEB or Kroger, yes it will appear to be a food desert.  But the mom and pop Mexican markets on every other corner are there

Edited by Johnny Sack
Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, Johnny Sack said:

It’s a lack of education and laziness.  Grocery stores are everywhere.  They even take food stamps.  Buy rice, beans, frozen veggies and protein. It’s cheaper than fast food. And much better for you.  

you sound like an oppressor.  poor folk on the govt tit have the right to eat junk food and have it paid for.  forcing them to receive free rice and beans is fascist. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Johnny Sack said:

Is there a food desert in Texas in a major city?  Where?  Because I guarantee in Houston 3 miles max radius I can find a regular or Mexican grocery store that will have anything you need.  

By the strict, and admittedly kind of ridiculous definition of not having a grocery store within a mile of your house, yes, there are plenty of food deserts in major Texas cities. But I think a mile is a much too narrow definition. I think two miles is more reasonable. 

When faced with the choice between walking 500 feet to the McDonald's around the corner, or walking three miles and trudging your groceries home, people choose the McDonald's like 95% of the time. It's much easier to make the unhealthy decision when faced with those two choices - even for people that really do want to eat healthier.

I am not suggesting we have some moral obligation to build supermarkets on every corner. But understanding a lack of access to quality fresh fruits and vegetables is a contributing factor to why poor people keep choosing that McDouble over the hassle it takes to get some fucking broccoli.

Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, DaysOff said:
50 minutes ago, 'stache said:
I get it if its strictly sustainance (more specally calories) per dollar, but that is a terrible way to evaluate cost and "nutrition." But if someone is trying to sustain themselves on fucking mcdoubles, I'm certain that whatever money can be saved eis far outweighed by the cost of clogged fucking arteries, hypertension due to sodium sensitivity, and the diabeetus for those who have it. As was mentioned, rice and beans are cheaper and more "nutritious" by just about any  legitimate standard.
 

That's because Dubner and Freakonomics are fucking stupid. He's the click bait of economists.

I actually like the podcast, and he is usually pretty thorough. This was apparently a debate on his blog, which I don't read. If he did this as a podcast he would definitely bring in a nutritionist and others to discuss the obvious problem with the soundbite premise.

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, irishtexan said:

By the strict, and admittedly kind of ridiculous definition of not having a grocery store within a mile of your house, yes, there are plenty of food deserts in major Texas cities. But I think a mile is a much too narrow definition. I think two miles is more reasonable. 

When faced with the choice between walking 500 feet to the McDonald's around the corner, or walking three miles and trudging your groceries home, people choose the McDonald's like 95% of the time. It's much easier to make the unhealthy decision when faced with those two choices - even for people that really do want to eat healthier.

I am not suggesting we have some moral obligation to build supermarkets on every corner. But understanding a lack of access to quality fresh fruits and vegetables is a contributing factor to why poor people keep choosing that McDouble over the hassle it takes to get some fucking broccoli.

Frozen veggies are cheap and healthy.  As are bananas and apples.  

I think the vast majority who choose to eat fast food every day aren’t eating fresh fruit and veggies if you delivered it to their door for them.  

They could buy bulk rice and beans. And load their freezer with frozen chicken and veggies.  They don’t. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

From a pure survival/calorie/economic point of view, it's a valid point.

For a healthy and balanced diet it's nuts. 

But the argument is still valid. 

The Great Depression/Dust Bowl is still in the living memory of my grandparent's generation. The fact that their great-grandchildren will hopefully never have to deal with that scale of food scarcity is amazing and in large part due to the US/Global economy.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, clapclapclap said:

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddrink/10210327/McDouble-is-cheapest-and-most-nutritious-food-in-human-history.html

A 2007 University of Washington survey found that while junk food costs as little as $1.76 per 1,000 calories, fresh vegetables and healthier foods can cost more than 10 times as much.

What the fuck is this cheap fast food?  A dollop of grease with taco sauce?

The average burger meal out there is about $7 and that's like drive-thru, nothing you'd sit down in a restaurant for, which is more.  And the Mickey D regular (not double) cheeseburger + medium (not large) fries + drink (even if zero calorie diet) is about 800 calories.

I know I was sick the day they had maths, but that's a fuckuva lot more than $1,76 per thousand cals.  

I eat 3 salads per week with a total expenditure of about nine bucks total.  And it ain't no wimp salad.  It's a full plate.   Sure, you get your $25 head of lettuce at Whole Paycheck or something, it's gonna be up-the-ass expensive.  But not at a normal store .

I mean that made me laugh.  That sentence.   But I guess you'd lose weight with that $1.76 meal.  It has to be so godawful lard/chem terribad that you'll just shit back out a thousand calories within 15 minutes of ingesting whatever the fuck that meal would be.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, hornian said:

From a pure survival/calorie/economic point of view, it's a valid point.

For a healthy and balanced diet it's nuts. 

But the argument is still valid. 

 

Yep - They're weighing the caloric load AND the nutritional valve vs. the cost.  There is plenty to eat cheaply that is healthier but not necessarily with the same gross caloric load.  As was said above, you have to eat a metric shit-ton of broccoli to achieve the same caloric intake and the cost per calorie is part of the equation. 

Edited by Reagan1k
Link to post
Share on other sites



From a pure survival/calorie/economic point of view, it's a valid point.
For a healthy and balanced diet it's nuts. 
But the argument is still valid. 
The Great Depression/Dust Bowl is still in the living memory of my grandparent's generation. The fact that their great-grandchildren will hopefully never have to deal with that scale of food scarcity is amazing and in large part due to the US/Global economy.


My dad's first name was doctor and still licked his plate into his 50s having grown up on a poor South Texas cotton farm during the Depression.
Link to post
Share on other sites
57 minutes ago, Zepol87 said:

Went to lunch with a coworker today and spent 14 dollars on a salad from Salata. Give me that Mcdouble fam

Salata goes hard af tho. Why didn't you get a wrap?

Also those pita chips are like crack. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, irishtexan said:

By the strict, and admittedly kind of ridiculous definition of not having a grocery store within a mile of your house, yes, there are plenty of food deserts in major Texas cities. But I think a mile is a much too narrow definition. I think two miles is more reasonable. 

When faced with the choice between walking 500 feet to the McDonald's around the corner, or walking three miles and trudging your groceries home, people choose the McDonald's like 95% of the time. It's much easier to make the unhealthy decision when faced with those two choices - even for people that really do want to eat healthier.

I am not suggesting we have some moral obligation to build supermarkets on every corner. But understanding a lack of access to quality fresh fruits and vegetables is a contributing factor to why poor people keep choosing that McDouble over the hassle it takes to get some fucking broccoli.

Also, Grocery stores don't have ballpits.

 

Checkmate.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I invest in real estate in some pretty shitty parts of Houston.  So I’m all over There are Mexican grocery stores everywhere.   And those stores sell everything you need.  Staples.  Great Produce.  Fresh and frozen proteins.  Dairy.  

If you do a google maps search for HEB or Kroger, yes it will appear to be a food desert.  But the mom and pop Mexican markets on every other corner are there

doesn't appear to be much in the way of mexican markets in the third ward.  nearest supermarkets are down on OST (an HEB and an Aldi), the fiesta in midtown (which IIRC won't be around much longer), or a kroger on the other side of 45.  there's a handful of independent markets in the 3rd ward but i'm guessing that prices are terrible and quality is poor (well, the co-op probably has good quality but i'm guessing the prices are high).  it's like a whole room full of gas station bananas. 

here's a map, knock yourself out (and yes, it has supermercados in it)

the biggest thing that would help people is having vegetables growing everywhere in cities.  medians and creek banks in houston should be overflowing with citrus.  that doesn't need top-down organizing but it does need cooperation from municipalities to let people use the land (and then not come in with a mower and chop it all down). 

if you work multiple jobs and take mass transit for hours to get to work, the most important factor in eating mcdonalds may not be education or laziness, but time.  walking or transit to a grocery store may take 20 or 30 minutes each way.  cooking beans may not take much in the way of actual prep time or active cooking time, but they do have to be on the heat for 1-4 hours.  roasting a chicken takes an hour, etc.  if you don't have access to a fridge at work a roast chicken doesn't do much good anyway. 

That said, I'll note the older hispanic ladies who work at the local mcdonalds bring their lunches.

 

 

Edited by elfenix
  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Back when I was in grad school and still weighed like 120 pounds, I used to stop at a convenience store on the way to campus every morning and buy two fried fruit pies for breakfast.  Those things had about 1500 calories each.  

Like these, except the local brand:
0078993683f7ab469bcd2a5823a1f853.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...