Jump to content
MrPhlegm

Tell Me About Texas a&m

Recommended Posts

Fresh from the rant

Posted by PeeJayScammedGT iconGATech.gif online on 6/30/20 at 8:41 am to GatorOnAnIsland
Really?

"Zulu Tribe"

They might as well give Jimbo his buyout money and let him move on

The way this thing is working out, this has to be "a plant" by Tom Herman

In 2020 what kind of outdated idiot refers to the home team as a Zulu Tribe when they're coming out of the tunnel?
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Below is a speech given by an A&M faculty member (head of the English Dept), addressing the A&M student body on December 11, 1898 during the on-campus remembrance of Jefferson Davis before the entire student body. Imagine the assembled Texas A&M "corps of cadets," resplendent in their Confederate gray uniforms of the era, listening intently.

Remember that Sul Ross accepted the position at A&M in August 1890. This speech shows some of the culture of A&M at the time and illustrates what Sul Ross "saved."

Note that there is no evidence whatsoever of Ross ever repudiating the content or sentiment of this speech. In fact, there is no evidence whatsoever other than that Sul Ross sought to perpetuate exactly this school of thought. Ross fought off all who sought to change A&M and Ross is today celebrated for ensuring this type of education was preserved, to be taught without end to each and every aggy, in perpetuity. In other words, timeless aggy values.

The question isn't whether Lawrence Sullivan Ross was "a man of his time." He unquestionably was. The question is whether what Ross believed in constitutes timeless American or Texan values. Ask yourself if any of these comments represent what should have been taught in 1890 or should still be taught to this very day on the Texas A&M campus.

Or should this school of thought have been wiped from the face of the Earth long ago.

By "saving" and perpetuating this type of indoctrination, did Sul Ross make truly Texas a better place for all, or did he merely perpetuate virulent racism?

I think we all know the answer.

More importantly, who can point in the history of Texas A&M to when enlightened individuals ceased this type of teaching on the A&M campus and publicly repudiated it without reservation? We know a departure from what Sul Ross "saved" didn't "just happen." Cultural change doesn't "just happen" at Texas A&M. Especially when it was Sul Ross who fought to ensure that culture would continue, in perpetuity.

It is fair to ask, "Who was the first aggy to publicly repudiate the teachings and culture of the Texas A&M that existed during the Sul Ross era?" 

Better yet, "Why are all aggys today not publicly repudiating the teachings and culture of the Texas A&M that existed during the Sul Ross era?"

Quote

In the brief time allotted me, I will say that I think we very appropriately contribute our humble part in the celebration of this solemn day, which witnesses the funeral of Jefferson Davis. From Mexico to Maryland, from the Ohio to the Gulf of Mexico, the South, with unanimous sorrow (not loud, but deep) and woe unspeakable, mourns for the irrevocable departure of her hero, her martyr, her president, her foremost representative man, whose 'saintly soul floats upon the Stygian river.’

Some of us who are present today were personally associated with the cause whose champion and chief he was. We thought him perhaps divinely appointed to lead the Southern States to a position of independence and renown more conspicuous than that of the proudest empire in the world. And when the dreams of Southern states men of a political autonomy for the South finally ended in disappointment and overwhelming disaster; when the miserable remnants of the regiments and battalions of the South accepted the mercy of the iron-handed conqueror, and silently sought their ravaged homes again; when we saw the chieftain whom we had hailed as the noblest paladin of liberty, stripped of power and authority and plundered of his regal state, ignominiously incarcerated, exposed to the mockery and the malignity of a victorious fanaticism; when we heard the loud roar of congratulations and rejoicings, that, in the excitement and the arrogance of unexpected triumph, shook the North, mingled with denunciations of the vanquished foe, the conviction of the perfect justice of our cause was not so strong within us, as when in those unforgotten days Lee and Jackson routed army after army, and sent their swift-winged terrors to the gates of Northern metropolises; and our admiration for the character and genius of Mr. Davis may have suffered some eclipse in the universal despondency, uncertainty, and darkness which prevailed.

But now, after twenty-five years of study of the history of this country, of the origin of the States and their relation to the general government, and of the course of events preceding and during the great civil war, my deliberate and conscientious judgment is, that the South was in reality contending for a great constitutional principle, whose utter destruction will mean the destruction of this government, and whose recognition and re-establishment will mean the perpetuation of democratic institutions; and that, as just perceptions gain ground among the generations that are to follow, Jefferson Davis will be acquitted of error or wrong, the purity of his motive will not be assailed, and his name be valid among all men everywhere in the free and enlightened nations of the earth.

Yes, young men of Texas, you may be proud that you are countrymen of Jefferson Davis. He is a sublime figure in the history of the world; and I would a thousand times rather his name and reputation were mine, than live in history as the man whose audacious act precipitated upon American civilization the abomination of African citizenship; or he who, encompassed and supported by a million of soldiers, compelled the surrender of the incomparable Lee.

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.$b34719&view=plaintext&seq=57&size=125&q1=51

 

Edited by Randolph Duke

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Randolph Duke said:

Below is a speech given my an A&M faculty member (head of the English Dept), addressing the A&M student body on December 11, 1898. Remember that Sul Ross accepted the position at A&M in August 1890. This speech shows some of the culture of A&M at the time and illustrates what Sul Ross "saved."

Note that there is no evidence whatsoever of Ross ever repudiating the content or sentiment of this speech. In fact, there is no evidence whatsoever other than that Sul Ross sought to perpetuate exactly this school of thought. Ross fought off all who sought to change A&M and Ross is today celebrated for ensuring this type of education was preserved, to be taught without end to each and every aggy, in perpetuity. In other words, timeless aggy values.

The question isn't whether Lawrence Sullivan Ross was ":a man of his time." The question is whether what Ross believed in a stood for constitute timeless values. Ask yourself if any of these comments represent what should have been taught in 1890 or should still be taught to this very day on the Texas A&M campus.

Or should this school of thought have been wiped from the face of the Earth long ago.

By "saving" and perpetuating this type of indoctrination, did Sul Ross make truly Texas a better place for all?

 

spacer.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Beau Vine said:

 

Lots of aggy in that post, trying to convince everyone that he said "blaggie" and not "blackie".  And they define "blaggie", which no one has ever heard of before, as a black aggy.  So yeah, the old racist definitely was asking "are you an aggy or are you a black aggy?".  That makes so much sense.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, OU Sucks said:

Lots of aggy in that post, trying to convince everyone that he said "blaggie" and not "blackie".  And they define "blaggie", which no one has ever heard of before, as a black aggy.  So yeah, the old racist definitely was asking "are you an aggy or are you a black aggy?".  That makes so much sense.

I think he did say Blaggie.  I don't think that makes it any better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Johnny Sack said:

I think he did say Blaggie.  I don't think that makes it any better.

I think so too. And same. He was very clumsily trying to convey the idea that aggys are aggys regardless of skin color. (I don't think he really believes that, though, based on that institution's history with race relations and diversity.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Js1 said:

Blagger, please. 

 

32 minutes ago, Johnny Sack said:

I think he did say Blaggie.  I don't think that makes it any better.

 

12 minutes ago, Js1 said:

Blagger, please. 

Nor does this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Holy crap. lol

The money quote:
"TexAgs users either were ignorant to or explicitly against
“Blackness” in general, thus defining their own social structure in White terms while
ascribing property value to former TAMU athletes based on perceived Whiteness."

 

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/340490477_Cyber_Racism_Toward_Black_Athletes_A_Critical_Race_Analysis_of_TexAgscom_Online_Brand_Community

Cyber Racism Toward Black Athletes: A Critical Race Analysis of TexAgs.com Online Brand Community

Abstract
While athletes in the 21st century have strategically leveraged technology and social media to disseminate their powerful truths (e.g., narratives) and to use as tools for organization, empowerment, and the disruption of hegemonic norms, sports fans have also found refuge on the internet and in cyberspace—namely, within online brand communities (OBCs). In this study, we draw from critical race theory (CRT) to interrogate cyber racism against Black male athletes in the http://TexAgs.com OBC. The primary purpose of this study was to conduct an exploratory collective case study of fan-generated discourse about Michael Bennett, Mike Evans, Myles Garrett, and Von Miller. Content analysis was used to examine and uncover the racially charged language directed toward these athletes. Three salient, interrelated themes were (1) good Aggie versus bad Aggie dichotomy, (2) dumb/misguided, and (3) thug. In line with the counter-narrative/storytelling tenet of CRT, we present Michael Bennett’s (2018) personal narrative from his book to directly counter the racialized discourse about his peers and him on TexAgs. Based on the findings, we conclude with implications for sport communication and social justice in both the public sphere and cyberspaces.
 
 
"With over 10,000 subscribers, and even more followers via social media (e.g.,
112K on Twitter), TexAgs has easily become a virtual tradition and “ . . . the most
active and engaged online Aggie community in the world” (TexAgs.com). Furthermore,
Bennett (2017) notes that Alexa.com has frequently deemed TexAgs amongst
the top 10 in global trafficking amongst football websites. This is noteworthy as,
“the firm is often the only intercollegiate site listed among global professional teams
and league sites” (Bennett, 2017, p. 155). Thus, with a following of this magnitude
and evident global reach, it is imperative to investigate the accepted norms, construction
of knowledge, and discourses taking place in this cyberspace as well as
consider the implications this yields."
 
"Although a few users on TexAgs expressed support for the Black
male athletes in our study, the majority of the comments across our four cases
included racially charged comments about these athletes’ activism."
 
Quote
Bennett discussed the struggles—physically and psychologically—that many young Black male athletes
had within the culture of Texas A&M Athletics, a largely White industrial space. “I
always told coaches that there should be more guidance to help players adjust to an
alien environment,” stated Bennett who came from a diverse part of Houston before
moving to College Station where “everything felt all-white” (p. 31). Reflecting on
his own experiences, Bennett stated the following:

On campus, sometimes people treated me like a hero, a god, because football is king in
Texas. But other times, with the pads off, I was anything but. Once I was near my dorm
late at night, and a big drunk group of students started shouting, “Hey, nigger! Go back
to Africa, nigger!” I wasn’t mad so much as disappointed . . . . I was half god, half
property. But whichever half they were dealing with, I was never fully human. Is my
being nerdy of interest? Do they celebrate things that have happened in the life of my
community? You come to find out, painfully, that the answer is less “No” than “Why
should we care?” College is supposed to be about intellectual and social growth, but
when you play football, they don’t want you to grow. (pp. 31–32)
 
From a White as property interest standpoint, Bennett’s reflection on and analysis
of his experience at Texas A&M lines up with our analysis of the TexAgs community.
In users’ discussion of Bennett, they denied him the right to be fully human,
clearly “Other-ing” Bennett and other former Aggies who engaged in anti-racist
politics. Although an occasional user posted something relating to Bennett’s charitable
work, it was made clear that the majority of TexAgs users showed little-to-no
interest in Bennett beyond his value as a football property.
"
 
Edited by Randolph Duke

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, 927 E. 41st said:

 Stopped reading at "powerful truths".

The post-grad research papers tend to be some of the best sources for verifiable information. They often have really good citations to continue research on obscure topics.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, C-Man said:

He was very clumsily trying to convey the idea that aggys are aggys regardless of skin color.

How in the world does "Are you an aggie or a blaggie" jibe with that?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Randolph Duke said:

Holy crap. lol

 

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/340490477_Cyber_Racism_Toward_Black_Athletes_A_Critical_Race_Analysis_of_TexAgscom_Online_Brand_Community

Cyber Racism Toward Black Athletes: A Critical Race Analysis of TexAgs.com Online Brand Community

Abstract
While athletes in the 21st century have strategically leveraged technology and social media to disseminate their powerful truths (e.g., narratives) and to use as tools for organization, empowerment, and the disruption of hegemonic norms, sports fans have also found refuge on the internet and in cyberspace—namely, within online brand communities (OBCs). In this study, we draw from critical race theory (CRT) to interrogate cyber racism against Black male athletes in the http://TexAgs.com OBC. The primary purpose of this study was to conduct an exploratory collective case study of fan-generated discourse about Michael Bennett, Mike Evans, Myles Garrett, and Von Miller. Content analysis was used to examine and uncover the racially charged language directed toward these athletes. Three salient, interrelated themes were (1) good Aggie versus bad Aggie dichotomy, (2) dumb/misguided, and (3) thug. In line with the counter-narrative/storytelling tenet of CRT, we present Michael Bennett’s (2018) personal narrative from his book to directly counter the racialized discourse about his peers and him on TexAgs. Based on the findings, we conclude with implications for sport communication and social justice in both the public sphere and cyberspaces.
 
 
"With over 10,000 subscribers, and even more followers via social media (e.g.,
112K on Twitter), TexAgs has easily become a virtual tradition and “ . . . the most
active and engaged online Aggie community in the world” (TexAgs.com). Furthermore,
Bennett (2017) notes that Alexa.com has frequently deemed TexAgs amongst
the top 10 in global trafficking amongst football websites. This is noteworthy as,
“the firm is often the only intercollegiate site listed among global professional teams
and league sites” (Bennett, 2017, p. 155). Thus, with a following of this magnitude
and evident global reach, it is imperative to investigate the accepted norms, construction
of knowledge, and discourses taking place in this cyberspace as well as
consider the implications this yields."
Quote

Three salient, interrelated themes were (1) good Aggie versus bad Aggie dichotomy, (2) dumb/misguided, and (3) thug.

You can read any random thread on Texags to conclude that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, 6th Street said:

How could any recruit watch that "blaggie/blackie" video and think, "yep, that's the kind of place where I want to spend the next four years"?

But honestly, I thought that the first time I was greeted with "Howdy."

Seriously, I never set foot on that campus until after I was a student at UT. I still wasn't impressed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, 6th Street said:

How could any recruit watch that "blaggie/blackie" video and think, "yep, that's the kind of place where I want to spend the next four years"?

spacer.pngspacer.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Veerbone said:

spacer.pngspacer.png

Plus you know those cute little white girls from Colleyville or Centerville or Madisonville are just ready to rebel against daddy. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Js1 said:

Plus you know those cute little white girls from Colleyville or Centerville or Madisonville are just ready to rebel against daddy. 

One of those ain't the same...like, waaaaaaay different.   Your point still stands, but those communities are not similar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, Js1 said:

Plus you know those cute little white girls from Colleyville or Centerville or Madisonville are just ready to rebel against daddy. 

Don't forget North Zulch and Iola. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Randolph Duke said:

In the brief time allotted me, I will say that I think we very appropriately contribute our humble part in the celebration of this solemn day, which witnesses the funeral of Jefferson Davis. From Mexico to Maryland, from the Ohio to the Gulf of Mexico, the South, with unanimous sorrow (not loud, but deep) and woe unspeakable, mourns for the irrevocable departure of her hero, her martyr, her president, her foremost representative man, whose 'saintly soul floats upon the Stygian river.’

I wonder if that reference to Jefferson Davis is one of the earliest known examples of the aggy rollercoaster.

I think the old racist fuck said 'blaggie' and what he was saying to the young man was something like, "Are you an aggie like the rest of us, or are you a racist aggie who puts his skin color before his school?" It makes perfect sense because the old man thinks he's blind to the color of skin, damn certain that all true aggies must see things the same way, and as a man of neutral skin tone he's confident that one's skin color does not and should not inform a person's life or collegiate experience.

As much fun as it's been over the years to laugh at aggy for their willful ignorance, and their embrace of lies and myths to comfort themselves for their regular failures, their full and enthusiastic embrace of racism is pretty depressing to witness. Sure we've seem examples over the years but this just seems bigger and different. It never crossed my mind as a possibility that we'd ever witness Mississippi retire their state university's prominent confederate soldier monument along with the state's confederate flag, while aggy still proudly clutches the turdition of a traitorous, murdering racist. I hope that fucking school burns to the ground.

Edited by Chopper

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Beau Vine said:

How in the world does "Are you an aggie or a blaggie" jibe with that?

I didn't mean that it did but I probably was clumsy in my post. I *think* he thinks he's making a salient point. In his brilliant mind, he thinks he's being progressive to say there are no white aggys, or black aggys, just aggys. He's too ignorant, too backward and probably (at least) a little racist in asking his question that way. I mean "blaggie" rolled right off his tongue like he's been using it quite often. It's way the fuck out of bounds but I guarantee he doesn't think so at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, 6th Street said:

How could any recruit watch that "blaggie/blackie" video and think, "yep, that's the kind of place where I want to spend the next four years"?

Eighteen year-olds are not widely known to have the best critical-thinking skills.  It's easy to be influenced by the cute co-ed escorting you around, everybody telling you how great you are and the money that just showed up in your pocket.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Randolph Duke said:

 

 

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/340490477_Cyber_Racism_Toward_Black_Athletes_A_Critical_Race_Analysis_of_TexAgscom_Online_Brand_Community

Cyber Racism Toward Black Athletes: A Critical Race Analysis of TexAgs.com Online Brand Community

 
 
"
 

HOLY FUCK... you found a pot of Gold. 

I downloaded that research article. It is glorious. It asserts Texags is a racist Online Brand Community. 

Quote

On the contrary, the individuals in this study who embraced their Blackness, consistently voiced their opinions, and used their platform to speak out on systemic racism and social injustice were labeled as a bad Aggie and vilified within this OBC. Most notably, Michael Bennett received by far the most criticism in comparison to other cases—accounting for 67% of all posts analyzed in this study. Some users expressed strong disgust for Bennett and in some cases spewed racist comments and hate speech toward him and others:

Mike Winchell: MBennett has proved time and time again he is a POS. He will end up behind bars on day. Guaranteed. I don’t give a damn that he went to A&M. I’m not gonna blindly support a guy just because he went to A&M.

libertyag: Dred Bennett and his brother Kunta Kinte Bennett.

pfo: Michael Bennet needs to move to Africa and play football there and see how it works out for him. Later, when he is pennyless with CTE in Africa and surrounded by African witch doctors with bones in their noses and blowing talcum powder on him, ESPN can do a 30 For 30 on it called “Michael Bennet Blew It.”

 

 

Quote

Although he demonstrates a clear understanding of the context in which he decided to kneel during the national anthem and why he did so, this was not the only cultural space upon which he reflected. In fact, Bennett reflected much on his experiences while at Texas A&M and how the intersection of race, culture, and athletics impacted his experience as an Aggie. For example, Bennett discussed the struggles—physically and psychologically—that many young Black male athletes had within the culture of Texas A&M Athletics, a largely White industrial space. “I always told coaches that there should be more guidance to help players adjust to an alien environment,” stated Bennett who came from a diverse part of Houston before moving to College Station where “everything felt all-white” (p. 31). Reflecting on his own experiences, Bennett stated the following:

On campus, sometimes people treated me like a hero, a god, because football is king in Texas. But other times, with the pads off, I was anything but. Once I was near my dorm late at night, and a big drunk group of students started shouting, “Hey, nigger! Go back to Africa, nigger!” I wasn’t mad so much as disappointed .... I was half god, half property. But whichever half they were dealing with, I was never fully human. Is my being nerdy of interest? Do they celebrate things that have happened in the life of my community? You come to find out, painfully, that the answer is less “No” than “Why should we care?” College is supposed to be about intellectual and social growth, but when you play football, they don’t want you to grow. (pp. 31–32)

From a White as property interest standpoint, Bennett’s reflection on and analysis of his experience at Texas A&M lines up with our analysis of the TexAgs commu-nity. In users’ discussion of Bennett, they denied him the right to be fully human, clearly “Other-ing” Bennett and other former Aggies who engaged in anti-racist politics. Although an occasional user posted something relating to Bennett’s chari-table work, it was made clear that the majority of TexAgs users showed little-to-no interest in Bennett beyond his value as a football property. Accordingly, this denial of full humanness has become a central point of emphasis within Bennett’s personal narrative.

Quote

This study sheds light on several issues including the disconnect between active users of the TexAgs OBC and athletes’ lived realities, the lack of policing or monitoring currently taking place on this platform, and a gap in the literature criti-cally examining how sport communication within OBCs is not immune from cyber racism

Quote

In our case study of the TexAgs brand community, users made use of the forums to voice their opinions and construct a racially charged narrative of athletes that seemed detached entirely from the realities discussed by Michael Bennett in his book.

Quote

However, as poignantly noted by Michael Bennett, he is a Black man in America and will be a Black man in America long after his football career is over. Despite that reality, TexAgs users either were ignorant to or explicitly against “Blackness” in general, thus defining their own social structure in White terms while ascribing property value to former TAMU athletes based on perceived Whiteness.

 

Edited by Neonmoon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Chopper said:

 I hope that fucking school burns to the ground.

It would fall over before it could be set on fire. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, Neonmoon said:

HOLY FUCK... you found a pot of Gold. 

I downloaded that research article. It is glorious. It asserts Texags is a racist Online Brand Community.

The Finest Fans In All Sportsdom!®

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, TheRealRonWeaver? said:

I'm in awe of those kids' self-control. Maroon Hat deserved a beat-down.

Reminds me of ruff stuff real tough Mike McKinney

 

ZEWXT7A325GIZM4CB6KLQXVENE.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Neonmoon said:

I downloaded that research article. It is glorious. It asserts Texags is a racist Online Brand Community.

Can’t wait for the next research article asserting why water is indeed wet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, Scholz said:

Reminds me of ruff stuff real tough Mike McKinney

 

ZEWXT7A325GIZM4CB6KLQXVENE.jpg

He was defending the temporary aggy sacred land in Lubbock just like they defend their sacred grass and sacred statues.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, jinx said:

He was defending the temporary aggy sacred land in Lubbock just like they defend their sacred grass and sacred statues.

That’s like American embassies abroad 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry for the longcat, I suck but more hilarity from secrant.

: Texas Aggy fans hurling racist abuse towards student athletesPosted by PeeJayScammedGT iconGATech.gif on 6/30/20 at 9:09 am to texag7
quote:
According to the comments from a black professor he said “Blaggie”

In 2020 with everything going on since Trumpf got elected (Charlottesville etc), that guy had to know that saying "blaggie" was too close to THE LINE and crossing into a grey area of racism where you do not want to be

Blaggie doesn't sound like something you'd ever want to say in public, much less to a Black person's face
Posted by texag7 iconUSA.gif on 6/30/20 at 9:20 am to Captain Crown
quote:
And I am asking you if you still think that "Blaggie" is ok.



I never thought it was ok.

Do you think lsu tigers being named after a Confederate regiment is ok?
Posted by TigahJay iconMaryland.gif on 6/30/20 at 9:27 am to texag7
quote:
texag7


Are you the guy who called Texas recruits the N word on Twitter? My memory is hazy this morning.
Posted by PeeJayScammedGT iconGATech.gif on 6/30/20 at 9:29 am to texag7
quote:
I never thought it was ok.

Do you think lsu tigers being named after a Confederate regiment is ok?

Really?

The phonetic sound of the word TIGERS elicits a much different response from Blacks or anyone else for that matter than the phonetic sound of the word Blaggie
Posted by Captain Crown iconLSU.gif on 6/30/20 at 9:34 am to texag7
quote:
I never thought it was ok.


That was all I was asking.
 
quote:
Do you think lsu tigers being named after a Confederate regiment is ok?


I prefer Swamp Kittens personally. Also nice way to deflect from an Old Ag calling someone a "Blackie or Blaggie" Iconcheers.gif
Posted by texag7 iconUSA.gif on 6/30/20 at 9:38 am to Captain Crown
quote:
Also nice way to deflect from an Old Ag calling someone a "Blackie or Blaggie"


I corrected your questioned for you and then answered it.

You won’t answer mine because...well we already know what you think
Posted by Bigbearchaseme iconOlemiss.gif on 6/30/20 at 9:46 am to texag7
Post less.
Posted by Errerrerrwere iconLSU.gif on 6/30/20 at 9:46 am to texag7
quote:
well we already know what you think


You’re a racist that can’t find a job?
Posted by Captain Crown iconLSU.gif on 6/30/20 at 9:51 am to texag7
I am all for switching the name the "Bayou Bengals". But I'm sure someone would be upset about that as well.
Posted by lucki98 iconLSU.gif online on 6/30/20 at 10:03 am to p&g
Well how about stop hiding behind a monitor and you confront him?
Posted by p&g iconLSU.gif on 6/30/20 at 10:11 am to lucki98
Ok nerd

I’ll drive all the way to college station to confront a dude who’s prob not there anymore over a statute I do t even care about.



Are you this fricking stupid on purpose?
Posted by i am dan iconAuburn.gif on 6/30/20 at 10:11 am to scionofadrunk
quote:
Here come the excuses from the board racists for that old fart's slur


Answer me this.. I see the word "whitey" everywhere these days and never a word is said. I've seen "KILL WHITEY" many times as well.

Is that okay with you? THEY'RE EXACTLY THE SAME THING just to let you know, well, except the "KILL WHITEY" part.. that's a little different.

But that's quite okay with everyone for some idiotic reason.
This post was edited on 6/30 at 10:14 am
Posted by p&g iconLSU.gif on 6/30/20 at 10:17 am to i am dan
Of course it ok to these mentally deranged people.


Double standard is a concept they just don’t understand nor care to acknowledge.


frick em all I say.
Posted by scionofadrunk iconTennessee.gif on 6/30/20 at 10:30 am to PeeJayScammedGT
quote:
PeeJayScammedGT

Are you dumb? I was defending you.
Posted by atrueamerican iconBostonCollege.gif on 6/30/20 at 11:06 am to sand mountainDvalues
we’ll never move on as a society with people like that still around. it is a shame.

makes sense when you look at the school associated in this incident though. a bumpkin farm school.
This post was edited on 6/30 at 11:10 am
Posted by AgSGT iconTexasAM.gif on 6/30/20 at 11:18 am to Captain Crown
I think folks don't quite understand what the word racist means. It requires intent to belittle someone for no other reason than skin color. Do I think the old man said something that could be construed as racially insensitive, absolutely, but I am almost certain his intent was not to denigrate someone based on skin color. This goes far beyond what is happening at A&M, this entire country needs to relearn what the actual term racism or racist means because right now we've bastardized the word and in all honesty it has lost a lot of its power. A statue is not racist unless the intent of it's construction was to demean others because of skin color. Offense does not equal racism without intent
This post was edited on 6/30 at 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder if we could get CDC to suspend all athletic competition with Texas A&M as long as they maintain their campus shrine to their "Gallant Negro Killer®*"

 

*"Gallant Negro Killer®" is a registered trademark of Bestest Fans In All Of Sports, LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Texas A&M University.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Js1 said:

Plus you know those cute little white girls from Colleyville or Centerville or Madisonville are just ready to rebel against daddy. 

You'd think this, but from the sounds of it, it would be a quick way to be immediately ostracized from the entire campus.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
46 minutes ago, Randolph Duke said:

I wonder if we could get CDC to suspend all athletic competition with Texas A&M as long as they maintain their campus shrine to their "Gallant Negro Killer®*"

 

*"Gallant Negro Killer®" is a registered trademark of Bestest Fans In All Of Sports, LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Texas A&M University.

No, it would just give them a new talking point that we're looking for excuses not to play them because "tu's skeered".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, 6th Street said:

How could any recruit watch that "blaggie/blackie" video and think, "yep, that's the kind of place where I want to spend the next four years"?

Like @nnm and I have both asked before; why would any POC want to ever attend school there? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, C-Man said:

I didn't mean that it did but I probably was clumsy in my post. I *think* he thinks he's making a salient point. In his brilliant mind, he thinks he's being progressive to say there are no white aggys, or black aggys, just aggys. He's too ignorant, too backward and probably (at least) a little racist in asking his question that way. I mean "blaggie" rolled right off his tongue like he's been using it quite often. It's way the fuck out of bounds but I guarantee he doesn't think so at all.

This, and it also reveals his ignorance of modern America if he thinks a white person can approach a black person protesting and say something along the lines of "can't we all just get along?" and expect it to be well received. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, The Marsellus Wallace said:

And it's been answered: Fed Ex and cash.

to which, you can kind of understand why Mr. Leroy and company are so peeved-- how dare these employees criticize the company? y'all boys is PAID to be heah, Highway 6 runs both ways, y'all can git out, Jimbo will replace you

Edited by SwanderedTalent

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, SwanderedTalent said:

to which, you can kind of understand why Mr. Leroy and company are so peeved-- how dare these employees criticize the company? y'all boys is PAID to be heah, Highway 6 runs both ways, y'all can git out, Jimbo will replace you

You captured the mentality perfectly, all the way down to the accent. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


mpu


Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
×
×
  • Create New...