Jump to content

Texas Recruiting Notes 2022 - Bend Over & I’ll Show You


Recommended Posts

Don't get worked up by my response, my dude. The effort is admirable. I am telling you as a former VC and current entrepreneur, this plan has a lot of pitfalls. It also will present a lot of risk to whoever runs it.

So am I. I invested in a lemonade stands of Oak Forest and served on the board. Those were very lucrative because we were marketing the salespeople more so than the product, and all profits were reinvested to generate passive revenue with growth up to 60% and rising.

Why would this be risky for the person running it?
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, ousux said:
1 hour ago, Nivek said:

You don’t need a sleazy salesmen when you have money. All you invite is problems with those types.

Maybe not sleazy, but we could definitely use another Carrington type closer. Pretty sure we dont land Ossai and a couple other players without him doing his thang.

True.  Find the guy that can out sale the other 10 guys that are also coming with bags of money for the same recruits...Carrington might be that guy, or might have been a good start until we find "the guy"..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, Azbadlands said:

True.  Find the guy that can out sale the other 10 guys that are also coming with bags of money for the same recruits...Carrington might be that guy, or might have been a good start until we find "the guy"..

There’s not a single guy. It’s pretty much just networking and sales. There are a bunch of people who would be great for this role, which is what makes it all the worse that Sark a) hasn’t gone out and hired an ace for this spot and b) doesn’t appear to understand what a huge mistake he’s making. The latter is the bigger red flag of the two. 

  • Hook 'Em 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

27 minutes ago, Nivek said:


So am I. I invested in a lemonade stands of Oak Forest and served on the board. Those were very lucrative because we were marketing the salespeople more so than the product, and all profits were reinvested to generate passive revenue with growth up to 60% and rising.

Why would this be risky for the person running it?

There is a risk of some bag money being funneled through it. There are still a lot of grey areas with this NIL and Texas laws being more strict than perhaps other states. Someone from another university tips the IRS and they decide to look under the hood. If you are doing it as a for profit business, then it's a different case. This will be run by fans who typically don't mind bending the rules to give the school they love an edge. It can start out as a noble venture, but in my humble opinion, runs the risk of breaking laws down the road. In the NIL thread, I offered my support through my business, which is probably more in line with the intent of the NIL program.

 

Edited by ShowMeALoss
Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 minutes ago, Azbadlands said:

True.  Find the guy that can out sale the other 10 guys that are also coming with bags of money for the same recruits...Carrington might be that guy, or might have been a good start until we find "the guy"..

Seemed like BC was dead set on going to SC

Link to comment
Share on other sites

24 minutes ago, ShowMeALoss said:

There is a risk of some bag money being funneled through it. There are still a lot of grey areas with this NIL and Texas laws being more strict than perhaps other states. Someone from another university tips the IRS and they decide to look under the hood. If you are doing it as a for profit business, then it's a different case. This will be run by fans who typically don't mind bending the rules to give the school they love an edge. It can start out as a noble venture, but in my humble opinion, runs the risk of breaking laws down the road. In the NIL thread, I offered my support through my business, which is probably more in line with the intent of the NIL program.

 

All contracts have to go through UT compliance, which is interpreting the statute extremely broadly.
The NIL statute is not hard to follow and basically the only remedy for a violation of it is the school can (does not have to) punish the player or remove eligibility. There is no criminal or civil penalty, or other enforcement mechanism provided for the sponsors.
 

So there’s really very minimal risk as long as the person who runs it doesn’t decide to go rogue and start laundering money/under reporting funds, which again is not necessary since NIL is legal. This is not intended to be a bag operation for HS recruits. That would entail a very high level of risk, but that is something completely different. As long as the person actually follows their job duties, there’s not much risk at all here. 

The NCAA basically doesn’t exist anymore, so no one’s going to launch a massive investigation arguing these are not legitimate, market value deals (especially because it’s almost impossible to establish a market value for these services). And there’s no real risk with the FBI, because this is all legal now so there’s no money laundering/illegal transfer concerns here, like the FBI investigation a couple years ago.

Edited by Burt Macklin
  • Hook 'Em 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, Burt Macklin said:

All contracts have to go through UT compliance, which is interpreting the statute extremely broadly.
The NIL statute is not hard to follow and basically the only remedy for a violation of it is the school can (does not have to) punish the player or remove eligibility. There is no criminal or civil penalty, or other enforcement mechanism provided for the sponsors. On top of that, all contracts go through UT compliance so they can catch any unintended violations of the statute. 
 

So there’s really very minimal risk as long as the person who runs it doesn’t decide to go rogue and start laundering money/under reporting funds, which again is not necessary since NIL is legal. This is not intended to be a bag operation for HS recruits. That would entail a very high level of risk, but that is something completely different. As long as the person actually follows their job duties, there’s not much risk at all here. 

The NCAA basically doesn’t exist anymore, so no one’s going to launch a massive investigation arguing these are not legitimate, market value deals (especially because it’s almost impossible to establish a market value for these services). And there’s no real risk with the FBI, because this is all legal now so there’s no money laundering/illegal transfer concerns here, like the FBI investigation a couple years ago.

I was not worried about the NCAA. My concern was someone going rogue and running amok with federal and state laws. The NIL, as I understand it, is meant for businesses to pay players for their image, name and likeness. I don't know how setting up a new venture to collect donations from fans fit into that. If you're selling UT merchandise with player's autographs, would Co-op and others like UT athletics have problem with it? Lastly, it seemed like a lot of effort for someone to do it on a part time basis for a long period of time. Personally, I prefer simplicity but that's just me being lazy. :)

Edited by ShowMeALoss
Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 minutes ago, Burt Macklin said:

All contracts have to go through UT compliance, which is interpreting the statute extremely broadly.
The NIL statute is not hard to follow and basically the only remedy for a violation of it is the school can (does not have to) punish the player or remove eligibility. There is no criminal or civil penalty, or other enforcement mechanism provided for the sponsors.
 

So there’s really very minimal risk as long as the person who runs it doesn’t decide to go rogue and start laundering money/under reporting funds, which again is not necessary since NIL is legal. This is not intended to be a bag operation for HS recruits. That would entail a very high level of risk, but that is something completely different. As long as the person actually follows their job duties, there’s not much risk at all here. 

The NCAA basically doesn’t exist anymore, so no one’s going to launch a massive investigation arguing these are not legitimate, market value deals (especially because it’s almost impossible to establish a market value for these services). And there’s no real risk with the FBI, because this is all legal now so there’s no money laundering/illegal transfer concerns here, like the FBI investigation a couple years ago.

e8ff2253-3da4-41ba-86bd-1623138b28b5_text.gif.e8b6705fdb1f60a4c1a829574b0dea3c.gif

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

What do you mean risk of bag money? If you hand me $20k to boost the Oline I will find a way to pay them. Either via a paid interview, or autographs, or RGB’s gameshow of fucks. Seems to me there is a way to legitimize anything.

  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 minutes ago, ShowMeALoss said:

I was not worried about the NCAA. My concern was someone going rogue and running amok with federal and state laws. The NIL, as I understand it, is meant for businesses to pay players for their image, name and likeness. I don't know how setting up a new venture to collect donations from fans fit into that. If you're selling UT merchandise with player's autographs, would Co-op and others like UT athletics have problem with it? Lastly, it seemed like a lot of effort for someone to do it on a part time basis for a long period of time. Personally, I prefer simplicity but that's just me being lazy. :)

How did you convince anybody to invest in a venture that you are in charge of?

  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 minutes ago, Nivek said:

What do you mean risk of bag money? If you hand me $20k to boost the Oline I will find a way to pay them. Either via a paid interview, or autographs, or RGB’s gameshow of fucks. Seems to me there is a way to legitimize anything.

Bag money is what I consider paying money to a recruit or student without the payor receiving anything similar of value.

Orangeblood paying players for interviews is legit because it boosts their visibility as a business.

Some rich lawyer paying a player $20k for his autograph doesn't seem like a legit business transaction. 

With that said, I will let this topic go. Obviously, there is enough interest from posters here to try to do it. I prefer to offer my support, as I posted in the following thread: "Surly Horns Burnt Ends NIL Program- How YOU can help Texas with the NIL right now!

"I own a full-service commercial solar business in California and have an installation partner based in Austin, TX who we are planning to buy. If you guys living in Texas can identify building owners (including UT campus) who are Texas alums and wouldn't mind going solar, we can pay the players a lot of money ($50-100k per site) for a cameo. Perhaps the player does the unveiling, signs autographs and take pictures, so the building owner gets to keep them as souvenirs or hang them on the walls. The building owner doesn't pay a dime for anything. We would pay for the system and pay the player for helping with the biz dev. It would be less work for all involved. I am just throwing it out there as an option that I can support."

This can be a huge money making machine given how many buildings and parking lots that could have solar on them.

 

Edited by ShowMeALoss
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was not worried about the NCAA. My concern was someone going rogue and running amok with federal and state laws. The NIL, as I understand it, is meant for businesses to pay players for their image, name and likeness. I don't know how setting up a new venture to collect donations from fans fit into that. If you're selling UT merchandise with player's autographs, would Co-op and others like UT athletics have problem with it? Lastly, it seemed like a lot of effort for someone to do it on a part time basis for a long period of time. Personally, I prefer simplicity but that's just me being lazy.

Dude, I thought you were some hotshot VC, even I know that you don’t run this like some drunken cowboy. The NIL ruling allows for funneling money to players/recruits via legitimate means.

A paper trail isn’t going to harm the program, in fact it only helps it. Now we are free to buy F250s as payment. Hell, I could hire Bryce Anderson to give me a haircut or mow my yard for $50,000 or give me interior decorator advice. I imagine CTJ-SC industries would be there to help connect player to the buyer, and help the player with filing taxes and compliance. Assuming that is his business model, of which I have no actual idea.
  • Hook 'Em 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, Nivek said:

What do you mean risk of bag money? If you hand me $20k to boost the Oline I will find a way to pay them. Either via a paid interview, or autographs, or RGB’s gameshow of fucks. Seems to me there is a way to legitimize anything.

First off, I'm obviously in support of what the guys here are trying to do with this NIL stuff. I think they've considered everything and are on the right path. But with any of these NIL deals, from what we're seeing suggested here all the way to whatever some group might try doing at Ohio State/Wherever that may be similar, there is going to be a risk of bags just because you're mixing athletes and big money fans in an environment where the big money is already spending. People get greedy, want another inch (twss). So not necessarily bags coming from the organizers, but from the participants, secretly.

But that's just the risk you have to take, and work to control as much as possible, because you can't just sit and do nothing a la Crystal while everyone else gets theirs off. 

 

  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

32 minutes ago, ShowMeALoss said:

I was not worried about the NCAA. My concern was someone going rogue and running amok with federal and state laws. The NIL, as I understand it, is meant for businesses to pay players for their image, name and likeness. I don't know how setting up a new venture to collect donations from fans fit into that. If you're selling UT merchandise with player's autographs, would Co-op and others like UT athletics have problem with it? Lastly, it seemed like a lot of effort for someone to do it on a part time basis for a long period of time. Personally, I prefer simplicity but that's just me being lazy. :)

We get it. You don’t know shit. You can stop going out of your way to demonstrate how little about this you understand while you simultaneously conjure up non-existent risk and boogeymen to go with your ignorance. 

  • Hook 'Em 4
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, SydneyCarton said:

We get it. You don’t know shit. You can stop going out of your way to demonstrate how little about this you understand while you simultaneously conjure up non-existent risk and boogeymen to go with your ignorance. 

No you don't get it and that's the saddest part. I would love to see your background so we can judge if you only talk out of your ass to make yourself seem important or you actually know shit about business.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, ShowMeALoss said:

No you don't get it and that's the saddest part. I would love to see your background so we can judge if you only talk out of your ass to make yourself seem important or you actually know shit about business.

You're trying too hard for someone who claims to be lazy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

44 minutes ago, ShowMeALoss said:

I was not worried about the NCAA. My concern was someone going rogue and running amok with federal and state laws. The NIL, as I understand it, is meant for businesses to pay players for their image, name and likeness. I don't know how setting up a new venture to collect donations from fans fit into that. If you're selling UT merchandise with player's autographs, would Co-op and others like UT athletics have problem with it? Lastly, it seemed like a lot of effort for someone to do it on a part time basis for a long period of time. Personally, I prefer simplicity but that's just me being lazy. :)

Part of NIL is having a contract with the player. The university compliance department reviews the contract before time to make sure it doesn't violate any laws. So that shouldn't be an issue

Link to comment
Share on other sites

28 minutes ago, ShowMeALoss said:

No you don't get it and that's the saddest part. I would love to see your background so we can judge if you only talk out of your ass to make yourself seem important or you actually know shit about business.

This conversation always leads to a nurse posting their paycheck

  • Hook 'Em 1
  • Fuck Around and Find Out 2
  • Haha 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Ă—
Ă—
  • Create New...