Jump to content
DCA_HORN

When did old Austin die?

Recommended Posts

On 2/10/2020 at 5:58 PM, Patricio Swayze said:

Why in the actual fuck would anyone eat at Burger King?

Maybe that Burger King.  

Younger Al made Whoppers to die for at the Ben White location back before and while old Austin was dying.  

Old Austin died when they renamed 24th street.  I’m sure the ex-mayor with the changing last names had something to do with it.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, gsoda3 said:

aug - oct 2007 in the greenbelt was the absolute best it's ever been.  the july rains made for some incredible tubing and stupid decisions.  

You can say Jun-Oct really. That was the summer that it rained almost every other day starting in June. I was still in school and didn't have a job that summer so I spent most of my days out there or in New Braunfels on the rivers. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, Lat22 said:

They renamed 24th street?

It's called Michael Keaton now

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Al Czervik said:

Maybe that Burger King.  

Younger Al made Whoppers to die for at the Ben White location back before and while old Austin was dying.  

Old Austin died when they renamed 24th street.  I’m sure the ex-mayor with the changing last names had something to do with it.  

26th Street you mo-ron.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, 52-80 said:

It's called Michael Keaton now

That's 26th Street.  And I think it was named after Diane Keaton.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Jerry Callo said:

That's 26th Street.  And I think it was named after Diane Keaton.

No, it was named after the Gabriel Byrne character in “The Usual Suspects.”  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, NorthLoop said:

You can say Jun-Oct really. That was the summer that it rained almost every other day starting in June. I was still in school and didn't have a job that summer so I spent most of my days out there or in New Braunfels on the rivers. 

I remember that summer as well. That was one of the two or three summers I remember where we had hard enough rain for people to tube down the stretch that goes through Campbell's hole. That was awesome. Me and my group were out there almost every weekend. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, alincoln said:

spacer.png

Shit, I rarely have those "damn this makes me feel old moments", but this one just hit me. When I watched this I thought these kids were in their late 20s, grown (I guess I was a young teenager). Now they all look like college students basically. Also, how did that dork wind up with the blonde? And yellow shirt is a lot hotter than I remember. And shit they picked the most east texas looking redhead they could find. F-150 and dip looking mfer.

 

When Matt McC gave his little speech about Austin being the place where hippies, cowboys, hipsters, etc. could all share a bar, I agreed about that being my ideal Austin too. But that place is going, going.... I get the points that are being made about cities all growing and adapting or whatever. But that's not the same conversation as a city losing its soul. What makes it laid-back is the values and attitudes. When the developers brought money into the equation, the attitudes and values shifted towards just that. Thus we get the Domain. And the Domain 2.0 on Riverside. And the inclusion and laissez-faire attitudes about sharing a bar with everyone goes out the window. Y'alls SXSW examples seem like a good example of the beginning to me. The social media generations will speed it up. Laid-back and welcoming and laissez-faire doesn't look good on an IG post, a cute manufactured quote on a dirty wall with a $12 cocktail in hand does.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/10/2020 at 3:27 PM, Jiggy-Z said:

Victor's Italian Village would like a word with you.

 

Speaking of Scholz's, back in the mid 80's and probably long before,  there used to be an informal polka band night(Thursday in the summertime).  A bunch of us from Longhorn Band would go and play.  Sometimes we would buy some beer, but we got a lot a pitchers paid for by the locals.  Whenever we got thirsty we would ditch the polka stuff and do some LHB stuff that was always good for some generous orange blood to open their wallet.  I remember the pitchers being about $5 bucks by then but I am not sure since I was usually pretty drunk. I do remember that whatever they charged was at least $1 more then the Posse East.

My grandfather was President of the bowling league at the Saengerrunde.  My grandmother would bring me out from the alley on league nights to sit in the back of the beer garden and dance with her while the Polka band played. It's a hell of a great memory for me. I can still remember some of the league guys were Germans from the hill country and would switch back and forth between languages more or less seemlessly, dropping a little Tejano in here and there as well.  My grand father could never speak it, but he would translate their stories for me.

And yes, each generation thinks Austin was ruined by the next. Both my grandparents would complain about how much better old Austin was.  Some how even when Comanches were still a threat to snatch folks west of town in the late 1870s (which my great-great grandmother wrote down stories about).

Edited by Bateshorn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^

that's awesome.  That German Heritage group is fun as hell to hang out with.  I keep meaning to formally join but we keep having little kids.  They like my overly-German name, but are sorely disappointed when I can't speak a word of Deutsch, but can speak fluent spanish.  And I can't play any polka instruments and can't bowl for shit.  But my beer drinking prowess keeps me on their recruiting radar.  It's a great bunch of folks, I hope to take my daughters there more when they get bigger (maybe not keep 'em in the alley like you ;)   ) 

But yeah, of all the places dad lived between Chicago, the East Coast, Northern California, he settles in the one part of the country where Mexican-Germans are actually the founding fathers...Central Texas.  I gotta shave my legs for dance season...

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, BurdineBandit said:

Shit, I rarely have those "damn this makes me feel old moments", but this one just hit me. When I watched this I thought these kids were in their late 20s, grown (I guess I was a young teenager). Now they all look like college students basically. Also, how did that dork wind up with the blonde? And yellow shirt is a lot hotter than I remember. And shit they picked the most east texas looking redhead they could find. F-150 and dip looking mfer.

 

When Matt McC gave his little speech about Austin being the place where hippies, cowboys, hipsters, etc. could all share a bar, I agreed about that being my ideal Austin too. But that place is going, going.... I get the points that are being made about cities all growing and adapting or whatever. But that's not the same conversation as a city losing its soul. What makes it laid-back is the values and attitudes. When the developers brought money into the equation, the attitudes and values shifted towards just that. Thus we get the Domain. And the Domain 2.0 on Riverside. And the inclusion and laissez-faire attitudes about sharing a bar with everyone goes out the window. Y'alls SXSW examples seem like a good example of the beginning to me. The social media generations will speed it up. Laid-back and welcoming and laissez-faire doesn't look good on an IG post, a cute manufactured quote on a dirty wall with a $12 cocktail in hand does.

I give it shit, but living off Rundberg and Lamar still has a bit of the old Austin vibe. The crime rate sucks, but the area is a melting pot. The feel welcomed and respected in every business I walk into, even though I'm sometimes the only gringo who frequents those places. Austin used to be a place with little judgement. The most raggedy looking person might be pretty wealthy. Born and raised here, and my parents always taught me that the people you expect the least from might just offer the most. I find that to be true in this neighborhood. Money and social status ain't everything. Actually, when it comes to people, it usually isn't much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, BurdineBandit said:

Shit, I rarely have those "damn this makes me feel old moments", but this one just hit me. When I watched this I thought these kids were in their late 20s, grown (I guess I was a young teenager). Now they all look like college students basically. Also, how did that dork wind up with the blonde? And yellow shirt is a lot hotter than I remember. And shit they picked the most east texas looking redhead they could find. F-150 and dip looking mfer.

 

When Matt McC gave his little speech about Austin being the place where hippies, cowboys, hipsters, etc. could all share a bar, I agreed about that being my ideal Austin too. But that place is going, going.... I get the points that are being made about cities all growing and adapting or whatever. But that's not the same conversation as a city losing its soul. What makes it laid-back is the values and attitudes. When the developers brought money into the equation, the attitudes and values shifted towards just that. Thus we get the Domain. And the Domain 2.0 on Riverside. And the inclusion and laissez-faire attitudes about sharing a bar with everyone goes out the window. Y'alls SXSW examples seem like a good example of the beginning to me. The social media generations will speed it up. Laid-back and welcoming and laissez-faire doesn't look good on an IG post, a cute manufactured quote on a dirty wall with a $12 cocktail in hand does.

Our old high school guidance counselor referred to the Austin melting pot as “hippies, kickers and nerds.” That’s what Austin was, maybe still is in some sense. She was a very wise woman. 

Sure a city can lose its soul. I think old LA eventually did. Its up to the old school to remember what it was and pass it on to the newcomers as much as can be possible. Nobody said that would be easy. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This video has been posted before, but it's pretty much a tour of Austin's heyday for me.

Amazing how few cars were on the road too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dean Carole Keaton Strayhorn Rylander Tom Thumb Randalls AppleTree Safeway is the prefered nomenclature for 26th Street.

Edited by Deej

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ve read through the thread and thought about it. I moved here as an 8 year old in 1991 so I have seen most of the changes and I have two answers.

1. The late 90s tech boom because it populated the suburbs. Austin wasn’t really a city where many people lived in the burbs until around that time. At the beginning of that decade, in 1990, around 5,000 people lived in cedar park. Now there are 80,000 there with an additional 130,000 in round rock. It was the first time where the greater Austin area began to stretch across large swaths of land.

2. 2009 The freak out over the 2008 collapse was in the beginning stages of recovery and people started moving to Austin from all over with good paying jobs. They growth was always there but this time it was different. Many were coming from outside of Texas and with a big budget. They wanted to live in the city and didn’t mind paying a ton or living in a high rise condo.This is when the culture of the city changed as much as the skyline.

I never cared much about money growing up because I could do everything that I wanted to with my middle class parents footing the modest bill. Rich or middle class didn’t matter too much because we all hung out at the same places. Hell, half of what I did was completely free. You never knew if the guy next to you wearing jorts and an obscure band shirt was homeless or a millionaire.

Money matters a lot in Austin now. It’s expensive to live in the parts of the city that make Austin cool. Most events and the better restaurants are expensive as well. I still hang out at places like workhorse and draughthouse that have a local vibe and won’t break the bank, but that’s not most people’s version of Austin anymore.

Im not too bitter about the changes because it’s been a constant since I’ve moved here. There was never a time that Austin wasn’t growing. I think the poster that said Austin is in it’s weird pre-teen awkward phase is pretty correct. There is a lot of almost anxiety about what Austin is and what it will become. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One firm demarcation for me was when the stick figure committing suicide from the parking garage between 8th & 9th off Guadalupe across from the old central library disappeared. I don't exactly know when that happened, but I missed him when he was suddenly gone.

Edited by bolverk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, JimmyJames said:

Our old high school guidance counselor referred to the Austin melting pot as “hippies, kickers and nerds.” That’s what Austin was, maybe still is in some sense. She was a very wise woman. 

She was a really good example too.  Some of those stories were hilarious.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


mpu


Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
×
×
  • Create New...